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    Women Supporting Women: How 4 Women Authors Are Supporting Each Other

    Don’t underestimate the power of women connecting and supporting each other in the literary world. I’m thrilled by the rise of authors committed to supporting each others work instead of competing.

    Traditionally we have been taught to be competitive with one another and fight our way to the top to be the “best” by any means necessary. However, the truth is that raising each other up and channeling the power of collaboration is truly how we’ll evoke change—and have a lot more fun along the way.

    Four women authors who all released picture books in January and February 2020 banded together a couple of years ago, vowed to support one another, and form a support group.

    Beth AndersonLizzie Demands a Seat! Rita Lorraine HubbardThe Oldest Student How Mary Walker Learned to Read Nancy ChurninBeautiful Shades of Brown: The Art of Laura Wheeler Waring and Vivian KirkfieldMaking Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe. Each of their books feature strong women engendering change as they find their voices through film, music, art, education, and action. 

    Beth Anderson: Lizzie Demands a Seat! Rita Lorraine Hubbard: The Oldest Student How Mary Walker Learned to Read Nancy Churnin: Beautiful Shades of Brown: The Art of Laura Wheeler Waring and Vivian Kirkfield: Making Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe.


    Beth Anderson loves digging into history and culture for undiscovered gems, exploring points of view, and playing with words. A former English as a Second Language teacher who has always marveled at the power of books, she is drawn to stories that open minds, touch hearts, and inspire questions. Born and raised in Illinois, she now lives in Loveland, Colorado. Author of AN INCONVENIENT ALPHABET (S&S 2018) and LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT (Boyds Mills & Kane, 2020), Beth has more historical gems on the way. 

    Rita Lorraine Hubbard is a former special education teacher and the author of THE OLDEST STUDENT (Schwartz & Wade, 2020), HAMMERING FOR FREEDOM (Lee and Low, 2018), and AFRICAN AMERICANS OF CHATTANOOGA (The History Press, 2008). A native of Chattanooga, Tennessee, she has made the celebration of unsung heroes her passion, and her work appears in The Tennessee Women Project and Salem Press’ Great American Lives: African American.  

    Nancy Churnin’s eight picture book biographies have won the Sydney Taylor Notable, South Asia Book Award, Anne Izard Storytellers Choice Award and Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, been honored on numerous state reading lists and been translated into Japanese, Korean, Braille and multiple languages in India, Sri Lanka and South Africa. A former theater critic for The Dallas Morning News, Nancy is an alumna of Harvard, with a masters from Columbia. She lives in North Texas.  

    Vivian Kirkfield loves bringing history alive for young readers. A former kindergarten teacher with a masters in Early Childhood Education, her non-fiction picture books include SWEET DREAMS, SARAH: FROM SLAVERY TO INVENTOR (Creston Books, 2019) and MAKING THEIR VOICES HEARD: THE INSPIRING FRIENDSHIP OF ELLA FITZGERALD AND MARILYN MONROE (Little Bee Books, 2020). Born and raised in New York City, Vivian has lived in the Litchfield Hills of Connecticut, the wide open spaces of Colorado, and now resides in the quaint little village of Amherst, New Hampshire, where the old stone library is her favorite hangout and her grandson is her favorite board game partner.

    If you are a current or aspiring writer, I hope this new trend of supporting your fellow authors resonates with you. Understand you can promote your own work and still take the time to support other writers and encourage their journeys. Remember that other writers are not your competition.

    Your turn: Have you read any of these amazing picture book biographies yet? What do you think about the idea of authors banding together to support each other? Feel free to share in the comments.

    Women Supporting Women: How 4 Women Authors Are Supporting Each Other

     

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    Lift Every Voice and Sing: 120th Anniversary of the National Black Anthem + Book Recommendations for Kids

    February 12, 2020 marks the 120th anniversary of the song Lift Every Voice and Sing. Often called “The Black National Anthem”, Lift Every Voice and Sing was written as a poem by NAACP leader James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) and then set to music by his brother John Rosamond Johnson (1873-1954) in 1899. The song was first performed in public in the Johnsons’ hometown of Jacksonville, Florida as part of a celebration of Lincoln’s Birthday on February 12, 1900 by a choir of 500 schoolchildren at the segregated Stanton School, where James Weldon Johnson was principal. 

    Lift Every Voice and Sing has been a staple musical celebration of Black excellence and pride for the past 120 years. Our family adores the picture book entitled Sing a Song written by Kelly Starling Lyons and illustrated by Keith Mallett. Accompanied by gorgeous illustrations and song lyrics, the book is a beautiful reminder that each generation has had to “lift” their own voices to demand and protect their rights.

    So how can you celebrate and acknowledge the anniversary of this important song? You can begin by teaching your children, grandchildren or students the the history and meaning behind the Black National Anthem. I also encourage reading an #ownvoices book that accurately depicts the history of the song. Including Sing a Song, there are other picture books you can read like: Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing, Lift Every Voice and Sing, Lift Every Voice and Sing illustrated by Bryan Collier, or Lift Every Voice and Sing: A Pictorial Tribute to the Negro National Anthem.

    You can also download the Sing a Song activity sheet that goes along with the book written by Kelly Starling Lyons. Click here to download.

    Book featured: Sing a Song by Kelly Starling Lyons

    Watch a video about the song like this one shown below.

    Lift Every Voice and Sing

    Lyrics:

    Lift ev’ry voice and sing,
    ‘Til earth and heaven ring,
    Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;
    Let our rejoicing rise
    High as the list’ning skies,
    Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
    Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,
    Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;
    Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
    Let us march on ’til victory is won.

    Stony the road we trod,
    Bitter the chastening rod,
    Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
    Yet with a steady beat,
    Have not our weary feet
    Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
    We have come over a way that with tears has been watered,
    We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered,
    Out from the gloomy past,
    ‘Til now we stand at last
    Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.

    God of our weary years,
    God of our silent tears,
    Thou who has brought us thus far on the way;
    Thou who has by Thy might
    Led us into the light,
    Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
    Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee,
    Lest, our hearts drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee;
    Shadowed beneath Thy hand,
    May we forever stand,
    True to our God,
    True to our native land.

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    29 Days of Black History: Download This Printable to Use at Home or in Your Classroom

    I’ve had an idea to create a Black History resource for the past two years. Last year, with the help of a fellow author/illustrator Kathy Ellen Davis I provided you with a fun Black History Bingo game which was quite popular and downloaded over 5,000 times.

    This year, I connected with a very talented Black illustrator named Chasity Hampton, founder of Whimsical Designs by CJ, LLC. I hired Chasity to bring my vision to life and I think she did a fantastic job. I’m so excited to share Chasity and her work with you all. She’s the illustrator who created the adorable logo for my kid’s 50 States 50 Books literacy organization.

    Shameless plug for my kids and their 50 States 50 Books initiative: They are doing amazing work collecting and donating diverse children’s books to kids across America who don’t have access to diverse literature. Their story was featured in Time Magazine for Kids and The Huffington Post just to make a few. Just like last year, their goal is to collect and donate 2,500 diverse children’s books to each of the 50 United States. If you’d like to donate new or gently used books or monetary gifts to help their cause, please visit their website for details on how you can help. You can also follow their popular Instagram account here.

    Ok, back to the printable. My goals for creating this Black History resource for you are twofold:

    1) To provide parents, grandparents, educators, librarians, etc. with a fun and engaging resource to use with children either during Black History month or anytime of the year. I hope it gets kids excited to read and learn about Black History year round.

    2) To uplift a young and talented illustrator such as Chasity. Let’s face it, this resource would not be possible without her. SHE did this work, not me. I just had the vision and SHE brought it to life.

    This is the type of resource I wish I had when I was younger. So now as a parent, I get to live vicariously through my children and through the lives of children across the country and across the world who choose to use and share this resource.

    To use this resource, simply follow the suggested list of things to do each day (or make up your own) and color in the corresponding numbers on the paper as you complete them. At the end of the 28 or 29 days you should end up with a fully colored in poster.

    If you decide to download or share this resource, please tag me on Instagram @hereweeread so I can see it and share! Also, please tag Chasity too on Instagram @whimsicaldesigns_bycj. You can use the hashtag #hwrblackhistory if you’d like to share your kids or students using this resource. That would be my heart so happy!

    If you want to print it on 8.5 x 11 paper, you certainly can. However, the list of things to do each day will be harder to read in smaller font. Whichever size you choose to print this resource is up to you. For a better experience, I’d recommend either the 11 x 17 size or the 18 x 24 if you want a larger poster size. You can also choose the 24 x 36 size if you want a bigger poster, but it will cost more to print. Again, totally your call on the size you choose.

    I look forward to seeing images of kids enjoying this resource. Let me know in the comments what you think and if you choose to use it!

    Happy Reading, friends!

    Download the 29 Days of Black History Month resource here (Use this version during Leap Years. Note: 2020 IS a leap year so use this version for 2020.)

    Download the 28 Days of Black History Month resource here (Use this version during non-Leap years)

    P.S. If you enjoy this resource, I’d appreciate it if you subscribed to my email list HERE. I promise, I don’t send spam! One of my social media goals this year is to build up my e-mail list so subscribing would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

    If you need book suggestions, you may want to browse some of my previous blog posts linked below:

    50+ Picture Book Biographies Featuring Males of African Descent

    9+ Black Inventors You May Have Missed In History Class

    Black History Books for 3, 4 & 5 Year-Olds

    29 Black Picture Books for Black History Month, Or Any Month

    18 Picture Books That Help Keep Dr. King’s Dream Alive

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    black history, book reviews, children's books, diverse books

    Freedom Bird by Jerdine Nolen (A Book Review)

    Published by Simon Kids Format: Hardcover
    Source: Simon Kids

    Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Simon Kids in exchange for an honest review.  As always, all opinions expressed are my own.

    I’m in full 2020 review mode pouring over all of the beautiful books I’ve received from publishers and authors so far. Freedom Bird is an absolute gem that left me in happy tears with a full heart.

    In the beginning, readers are introduced to an enslaved family of four: Samuel, Maggie, Millicent and John Wheeler who live on Simon Plenty’s plantation. Very early on, John and Millicent’s parents are sold away leaving them behind.  Although the children were left alone on the plantation, their parents had already sown the seeds of freedom in their children’s minds and hearts. They told them stories of how people could fly away to freedom as free as a bird and they believed it.

    Photo courtesy of Simon Kids

    One day while working out in the field, a huge bird is flying overhead all of the enslaved people. Annoyed of the bird, the white overseer grabs his leather whip and yanks the bird right out of the sky injuring it.  Late in the evening, Millicent and John sneak out in the field and bring the injured into a shed to begin bringing it back to health. They are able to keep the bird hidden for four months until it was discovered.

    Upon discovery from the overseer, Millicent tells the bird to fly away and it does. In a daring escape to freedom Millicent and John follow the bird which leads them West.  In the author’s note you find out this book is a combination of three stories from history meant to all sit alongside each other: Big Jabe, Freedom Bird, and Thunder Rose. Millicent in this book is Millicent MacGruder, mother of Thunder Rose who escaped to freedom and went West.

    Photo courtesy of Simon Kids

    The thing I love most about this story is it filled me with so much comfort and peace knowing enslaved people desired and longed for freedom.  Some history books describe enslaved people as being “happy” which just isn’t true.  The fact that Samuel and Maggie sowed the seeds of freedom in their children’s minds and hearts fills me with so much joy.  I cannot begin to fathom what it must have been like to be enslaved living on a plantation especially as a child without your parents.  Humans are truly resilient beings.

    Freedom Bird is a beautifully written, compelling, (sometimes heartbreaking) yet inspiring story about enslaved Americans of African descent and their desire to be as free as a bird.  Due to a few pages of lengthy text, I’d recommend this one for slightly older readers ages 8 – 9 and up.  Although it can be read aloud with people of all ages.  A great book to add to your home, school or public library for reading during Black History Month or anytime of the year.  Publishes January 14, 2020 from Simon Kids. Ages 5-9 and up.

    Your turn: Have you ever read the other two books mentioned in this post (Big Jabe and Thunder Rose) also written by Jerdine Nolen?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    A Kids Book About: Tackling Tough and Empowering Topics With Children

    Disclaimer:  I received complimentary copies of these awesome books to enjoy and share in partnership with A Kids Book About.  As always, all opinions expressed are my own.

    In response to the extraordinary spread of COVID-19, A Kids Book About created a completely FREE resource to help kids and grownups everywhere learn more about COVID-19.  Click here to download.  Note: Be sure to choose the PDF version of the file to download.


    Talking to children about “tough” topics doesn’t have to be difficult. Especially when you have helpful books like these published from A Kids Book About. Have you seen these books yet?

    A Kids Book About publishes hardcover, high-quality books that cover a range of challenging, empowering and important topics for kids ages 5-9. They have an impressive growing collection of books about: money, creativity, feminism, body image, depression, cancer, racism and more.

    A Kids Book About all started with A Kids Book About Racism, a book written by co-founder and CEO, Jelani Memory. As a black father with a blended family (4 white kids and two brown kids), racism was an inevitable topic of conversation. He thought he’d only print one copy, but it turned out other grownups thought their kids could use an honest kids book on the topic. That one book turned into more by new authors on topics like belonging, feminism, gratitude, cancer, and so many more.

    Each book has an easy to follow text-only format with no illustrations. Essentially, these books are meant to be conversation starters and are best read with a grown up to answer any discussion questions children may have. I really enjoyed the books we received about racism, money and creativity.

    The book about racism really hit home for me because racial prejudice and structural racism is still very present in today’s society. This book made it very easy for me to explain to my children what racism is and they understood it.

    As we embark upon Black History Month a month and a half from now, it is my hope many educators and parents use A Kids Book About Racism to help navigate their discussions around race and racism.

    One of the biggest paradoxes with Black History Month is many view it as a “teachable moment” to help children learn about the same old topics like slavery and the Civil Rights Movement, but then abandon the topics again for a whole year. I believe it’s equally as important to educate ALL children on the ongoing presence of racism and not just during Black History Month.

    Check out A Kids Book About Racism to get a jumpstart on having the important conversation about race and racism. Be sure to also check out their other amazing books too. This series empowers adults to have straightforward and honest conversations with children in an engaging and relatable way. Recommended for ages 5-9 and up.

    Your turn: Have you checked out these books yet?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    black history, children's books, diverse books

    Black History Picture Book Bingo + Free Downloads!


    I am SO excited to share these Black History Picture Book Bingo cards with you!  When I came across author Kathy Ellen Davis’s Picture Book Bingo on Instagram, I immediately shared it with my Instagram audience.  I then reached out to Kathy and asked if she would create a Black History themed bingo card for me and she kindly said YES!

    If you’ve never played book bingo before, it’s pretty easy and straightforward.  Just read books to correspond with the categories on the card.  I’d recommend it for anyone who:

    • Enjoys reading
    • Likes reading new types of books they wouldn’t normally read
    • Likes to be challenged
    • Is a consistent and dedicated enough reader to complete the challenge

    Most of all, book bingo is about having FUN – even if you don’t complete the entire bingo card due to that thing called “life” we all live.  Really, though, if you enjoy books, I highly recommend giving this a shot at least one time through.  You can do it on your own, with your own children/grandchildren, other family members, friends or with your students.

    To create these bingo cards, I came up with different categories of books and Kathy was generous enough to hand letter them on her own!  I have a huge list of other categories that are not included on these cards so expect to see other versions of these bingo cards on occasion throughout the year.

    I think book bingo is a wonderful opportunity for kids (and adults) to have fun while reading, along with adding an extra incentive to complete the BINGO card.  Have you played book bingo before?

    Download the Black History Month Picture Book Bingo Card here

    Download the Black History Picture Book Bingo Card here

    Why two different versions?

    Use the Black History Month Picture Book Bingo card if you want to use it ONLY during the month of February which is Black History Month.

    Use the Black History Picture Book Bingo card if you want to use it any time during the year.

    Make sense?

    If you need book suggestions, you may want to browse some of my previous blog posts linked below:

    50+ Picture Book Biographies Featuring Males of African Descent

    9+ Black Inventors You May Have Missed In History Class

    Black History Books for 3, 4 & 5 Year-Olds

    29 Black Picture Books for Black History Month, Or Any Month

    18 Picture Books That Help Keep Dr. King’s Dream Alive


    Happy Reading!

     

     

    Your turn: Do you find these Bingo cards to be helpful?  Will you participate and try it?  Feel free to share in the comments.  I’d love to hear your thoughts and perhaps see photos of your completed Bingo cards!  If you share about this, use the hashtag #bhpbingo so I’ll see your posts.

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    Let’s Hear It for the Boys: 50+ Picture Book Biographies to Read Year Round featuring Males of African Descent



    This round-up of picture books highlights prominent and a few lesser-known male leaders of African descent.  Each male featured has a distinct story and legacy, but they all share some commonalities: poise and confidence that no doubt added to their iconic statuses. I hope you’ll enjoy this list and explore each story to witness their perseverance through oppression and their determination through struggle.  These books are great to read during Black History Month or anytime of the year.

    Happy Reading!

    Art Tatum

    Art Tatum, an African American pianist, and one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time, was born in 1909, in Toledo, Ohio.  Did you know he was blind in one eye and visually impaired in the other?  He was an amazing child prodigy with perfect pitch who learned to play the piano by ear.

    Arturo Schomburg

    Arthur Schomburg was a Puerto Rican historian, writer, and activist in the United States who researched and raised awareness of the great contributions that Afro-Latin Americans and African-Americans have made to society.

    Barack Obama

    Barack Hussein Obama is an American attorney and politician who served as the 44th president of the United States from 2009 to 2017.

    Bass Reeves

    Bass Reeves was the first Black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi River. He worked mostly in Arkansas and the Oklahoma Territory.  During his long career, he was credited with arresting more than 3,000 felons. He shot and killed 14 outlaws in self-defense.

    Bob Marley

    Bob Marley was a powerful musician and messenger; a poet and prophet of reggae culture. His music echoed from Jamaica all the way across the globe, spreading his heartfelt message of peace, love, and equality to everyone who heard his songs.

    Carter G. Woodson

    Carter G. Woodson is known as The “Father” of Black History.  He dedicated his life to educating African Americans about the achievements and contributions of their ancestors.

    Charles Albert Tindley


    Known as The Founding Father of American Gospel music, Charles Albert Tindley was born in 1851 in Berlin, Maryland. His father was enslaved, but his mother was born free.  Tindley wrote over 40 hymns in his lifetime. His “I’ll Overcome Some Day” was the basis for the American Civil Rights anthem “We Shall Overcome,” popularized in the 1960’s. Other songs he wrote include: “Stand By Me”, “I Know the Lord Will Make a Way”, and “The Storm Is Passing Over” among others.

    Charles White

    Born in Chicago in 1918, Charles W. White was one of America’s most renowned and recognized African-American & Social Realist artists.

    Charlie Sifford

    Charles Luther Sifford was a professional golfer who was the first African American to play on the PGA Tour.

    Claude Mason Steele

    Claude Mason Steele is an American social psychologist.  He is best known for his work on stereotype threat and its application to minority student academic performance.

    Clive Campbell

    Born in 1955 in Kingston, Jamaica, Clive Campbell is known as “The Father of Hip Hop”.

    Cornelius Washington

    Cornelius Washington was a veteran French Quarter sanitation worker who became famous following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    David Drake

    David Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, was an American potter who lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. Dave produced over 100 alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs between the 1820s and the 1860s.

    Dizzy Gillespie (John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie)

    John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer, and singer. Some call him one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all times.

    Ernie Barnes

    Ernie Barnes was an African-American painter, well known for his unique style of elongation and movement. He was also a professional football player, actor and author.  Did you know his popular paintings were featured in the sitcom Good Times?

    Frederick Douglass

    Famed 19th-century author and orator Frederick Douglass was an eminent human rights leader in the anti-slavery movement and the first African-American citizen to hold a high U.S. government rank.

    George Crum

    Meet George Crum, inventor of potato chips!

    George Fletcher

    George Fletcher was the first African American to compete for a world championship in bronco riding at the 1911 Pendleton Roundup.

    George Moses Horton

    George Moses Horton was an African-American poet from North Carolina, the first to be published in the Southern United States. His book The Hope of Liberty was published in 1829 while he was still enslaved.

    Gordon Parks

    A man of many talents, Gordon Parks is most famous for being the first Black director in Hollywood.

    Henry Brown

    Henry “Box” Brown was an enslaved man who shipped himself to freedom in a wooden box.

    Horace Pippin

    Horace Pippin was a self-taught African-American painter.

    Howard Thurman

    Howard Washington Thurman was a Black author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader.

    Jacob Lawrence

    Jacob Lawrence was one of the most important artists of the 20th century, widely renowned for his modernist depictions of everyday life as well as epic narratives of African American history and historical figures.

    Jackie Robinson

    Jackie Robinson broke boundaries as the first African American player in Major League Baseball. But long before Jackie changed the world in a Dodger uniform, he did it in an army uniform.

    James Madison Hemings

    Madison Hemings, born James Madison Hemings, was the son of the mixed-race enslaved Sally Hemings. He was the third of her four children— fathered by her master, President Thomas Jefferson.

    James Van Der Zee

    James Van Der Zee was an African-American photographer known for his distinctive portraits from the Harlem Renaissance.

    Jean-Michel Basquiat

    Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen.

    Jimmy “Wink” Winkfield

    Born into an African American sharecropping family in 1880s Kentucky, Jimmy Winkfield grew up loving horses. He later went on to become the last Black jockey to win the Kentucky Derby.

    John Coltrane

    John William Coltrane was an American jazz saxophonist and composer.

    John Lewis

    John Roy Lynch

    John Roy Lynch was the first African American Speaker of the House in Mississippi. He was also one of the first African American members of the U.S House of Representatives during Reconstruction, the period in United States history after the Civil War.

    Langston Hughes

    James Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist from Joplin, Missouri.

    Lonnie Johnson

    Meet the inventor of the Super Soaker Water Gun!

    Malcolm X

    Malcolm X was an American Muslim minister and human rights activist.

    Martin Luther King Jr.

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist during  the Civil Rights Movement.

    Michael Jordan

    Regarded by most as the NBA’s greatest all-time player, Michael Jordan won six titles with the Chicago Bulls.

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali was an American professional boxer, activist, and philanthropist. Nicknamed “The Greatest”, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest boxers of all time.

    Neil deGrasse Tyson

    Neil deGrasse Tyson, is an American astrophysicist whose work has inspired a generation of young scientists and astronomers to reach for the stars!

    Nelson Mandela

    Born on July 18, 1918 Nelson Mandela is best known for promoting messages of forgiveness, peace and equality.

    Paul Laurence Dunbar

    Born on June 27, 1872, Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the first African American poets to gain national recognition.

    Paul Robeson

    Paul Leroy Robeson was an American bass baritone concert artist and stage and film actor who became famous both for his cultural accomplishments and for his political activism.

    Ray Charles

    Ray Charles Robinson, known professionally as Ray Charles, was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and composer.

    Richard Wright

    Pioneering African-American writer Richard Wright is best known for the classic texts Black Boy and Native Son.

    Romare Bearden

    Romare Bearden was a visual artist who utilized painting, cartoons, and collage to depict African-American life.

    Thurgood Marshall

    Thurgood Marshall was an American lawyer, serving as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991. He was the Court’s 96th justice and its first African-American justice.

    Vivien Thomas

    Overcoming racism and resistance from his colleagues, Vivien ushered in a new era of medicine—children’s heart surgery. This book is the compelling story of this incredible pioneer in medicine.

    Wendell O. Scott

    Wendell Oliver Scott was the first African American race car driver to win a race in what would now be considered part of the Sprint Cup Series.

    William “Doc” Key

    William “Doc” Key, a formerly enslaved man and self-taught veterinarian believed in treating animals with kindness, patience, and his own homemade remedies.

    William “Bill” Lewis

    William “Bill” Lewis was an enslaved man who earned enough money being a blacksmith and set a daring plan in motion: to free his family.

    William J. Powell

    William J. Powell was an American businessman, entrepreneur, and pioneering golf course owner who designed the Clearview Golf Club, the first integrated golf course, as well as the first to cater to African-American golfers.

    Your turn: Did you learn about someone or something new after reading this post?  What other books would you add to this list?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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