Follow:
    children's books, diverse books, holiday books

    I’ll Always Love My Mama: 25+ Picture Books to Celebrate Mom or Grandma on Mother’s Day (Or Any Day)

    Mother’s Day.  It’s the one day of the year when many people pay tribute to that one person who gave you life – your mother.  And while every day can be considered to be Mother’s Day, I love the idea of having one holiday set aside to honor moms.  Amidst the demanding schedule of modern day life, Mother’s Day is the most opportune moment to tell your mom what she means to you.

    Mothers are often the foundation of the family, a source of sustenance and support. They are our caretakers, teachers, drill sergeants, cheerleaders and best friends. They anchor us and inspire us to reach for the stars.

    They take time off from work when we are born and have sleepless nights because we cry all night. They put food on the table, clothe us, and put a roof over our heads. When we get sick, the first thing we do is ask for our mothers. When we need advice, she will be there to give it and when we need to vent, she is there to listen. Our mothers are our best friends, even if the relationship between mother and child isn’t all that great.  As a mother, it is their job to protect us; just like it is the job of a lioness to protect her cubs. They hold our hands when we cross the road, but eventually have to let us spread our wings and fly.

    Below I’ve gathered a list of picture books that embrace different kinds of moms and showcase the precious love between a mother (or grandmother) and child.  Check these out to read with your little readers this Mother’s Day and beyond.

    In My Heart by Mackenzie Porter, illustrated by Jenny Løvlie
    This is what a mother tells her child as she leaves for work each day. This lovely board book perfectly captures the sentiment that many women feel about being a working mom. The lyrical text takes us through a mother’s day away, showing us that although she’s working hard, her child is always on her mind and always in her heart.

    Me and Mama by Cozbi A. Cabrera
    Mama’s love is brighter than the sun, even on the rainiest of days. In the tradition of Someday, this celebration of a mother-daughter relationship is perfect for sharing with little ones!

    On a rainy day when the house smells like cinnamon and Papa and Luca are still asleep, when the clouds are wearing shadows and the wind paints the window with beads of water, I want to be everywhere Mama is.

    Grandmother School by Rina Singh, illustrated by Ellen Rooney
    Every morning, a young girl walks her grandmother to the Aajibaichi Shala, the school that was built for the grandmothers in her village to have a place to learn to read and write. The narrator beams with pride as she drops her grandmother off with the other aajis to practice the alphabet and learn simple arithmetic. A moving story about family, women and the power of education―when Aaji learns to spell her name you’ll want to dance along with her.

    Priya Dreams of Marigolds & Masala by Meenal Patel

    Priya lives in the United Stated and her family is from India. She learns about India through her Babi Ba’s (grandma’s) descriptions of it and in the way that their Indian culture is woven through their lives every day. Priya is the hero in this book – her curiosity about her family’s heritage and the kindness and love that she shows to her Ba help to carry her family’s traditions forward. It’s a story about having pride for all of the pieces that come together to make you who you are and feeling the magic of a place without having been there. Ages 4-8.

    My Mommy Medicine by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Shannon Wright

    A beautiful book that showcases the unconditional love between a mother and daughter.  There’s just something about the instinctive nurturing of some mothers that seems to make everything feel better, right?

    What is Given from the Heart by Patricia C. McKissack

    A touching, powerful tale of compassion between a mother and her son.  This book reminds us all that what is given from the heart, reaches the heart.

    Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

    This lovingly-illustrated picture book memoir looks at the myriad gifts migrantes bring with them when they leave their homes. It’s a story about family. And it’s a story to remind us that we are all dreamers, bringing our own strengths wherever we roam. Beautiful and powerful at any time but given particular urgency as the status of our own Dreamers becomes uncertain, this is a story that is both topical and timeless.

    Hair for Mama by Kelly Tinkham

    It’s family picture time for the Carters, but Mama does not want to be in the photo this year. All of her beautiful hair is gone because of chemotherapy treatments for her cancer, and she doesn’t want to be remembered without hair. Eight-year-old Marcus knows that the picture won’t be the same without Mama, so he comes up with a plan to find her some hair and make her better.

    In My Anaana’s Amautik by by Nadia Sammurtok, illustrated by Lenny Lishchenko

    Nadia Sammurtok lovingly invites the reader into the amautik―the pouch in the back of a mother’s parka used to carry a child―to experience everything through the eyes of the baby nestled inside, from the cloudlike softness of the pouch to the glistening sound of Anaana’s laughter.

    Nine Months: Before a Baby is Born by Miranda Paul, illustrated by Jason Chin

    In this pregnancy book unlike any other one out there, watch what’s actually happening through meticulously detailed, actual size illustrations, perfectly paired with a lyrical yet informative text, and culminating in a warm, joyful birth scene.

    Saturday by Oge Mora

    Little Ava loves Saturdays because it’s the one day of the week when her mother doesn’t have to work. This Saturday is an extra special one because Ava and her mother are going to a one-night only puppet show. But first, they have plans to attend story time at the library, get their hair done at a salon and have a picnic in the park.

    Their special day doesn’t turn out as well as they hoped it would at all, but does it end well? You’ll have to read it to find out.

    When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree by Jamie L.B. Dennihan, illustrated by Lorraine Rocha

    “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” In this imaginative take on that popular saying, a child is surprised (and disappointed) to receive a lemon tree from Grandma for her birthday. After all, she DID ask for a new gadget! But when she follows the narrator’s careful—and funny—instructions, she discovers that the tree might be exactly what she wanted after all. This clever story, complete with a recipe for lemonade, celebrates the pleasures of patience, hard work, nature, community . . . and putting down the electronic devices just for a while.

    Hero Mom by Melinda Hardin


    An easy to understand depiction of a diverse group of moms serving in the military.  I like that it shows the women being strong leaders and that this book opens up discussions based on gender/sex roles.  Women are shown fixing military tanks, flying fighter jets, nursing soldiers back to good health and more!

    My Mommy is a Hero by Hannah Tolson

    Each and every day, mothers sacrifice for their children and their family.  But what is especially unique to military mothers is that they sacrifice day in and day out for their country too.

    Just Like a Mama by Alice Faye Duncan, illustrated by Charnelle Pinkney Barlow

    Just Like a Mama Alice Faye Duncan

    Carol Olivia Clementine lives with Mama Rose. Mama Rose is everything—tender and sweet. She is also as stern and demanding as any good parent should be. In the midst of their happy home, Carol misses her mother and father. She longs to be with them. But until that time comes around, she learns to surrender to the love that is present. Mama Rose becomes her “home.” And Carol Olivia Clementine concludes that she loves Miss Rose, “just like a mama.”

    Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow


    Today there are very few good children’s books that have Muslim or Islamic themes.  There are even fewer books that focus on the African-American Muslim experience like Mommy’s Khimar.  I love this adorable story about a little Muslim American girl who likes to play dress up with her mother’s khimar (hijab).  It’s a lively and upbeat story with engaging words and vibrant illustrations that oozes with love!

    Mama’s Belly by Kate Hosford

    A charming and touching story about a curious little girl and her family awaiting the arrival of her baby sister.  The family wonders how life will be different once the new baby arrives.  Would make a great baby shower gift for expectant mothers.

    Ten Cents a Pound by Nhung N. Tran-Davies

    An illiterate, hard working Vietnamese mother persuades her young daughter to go to school. The girl is torn between her desire to stay home with her family and the familiarity of their village, and her desire to discover the world beyond the mountains that surround them. Every time the girl insists that she will stay, her mother repeats that she must go, that there is more to life than the labor in the coffee trees.  A wonderful display of affection and the power of education and literacy.

    Who Will You Be? by Andrea Pippins

    For fans of I Am Enough, The Day You Begin, and The Wonderful Things You Will Be, here is a poignant picture book about how family and community help shape the wonderful people our children become.

    Between Us and Abuela: A Family Story from the Border by Mitali Perkins (Author), Sara Palacios (Illustrator)

    It’s almost time for Christmas, and Maria is traveling with her mother and younger brother, Juan, to visit their grandmother on the border of California and Mexico. For the few minutes they can share together along the fence, Maria and her brother plan to exchange stories and Christmas gifts with the grandmother they haven’t seen in years. But when Juan’s gift is too big to fit through the slats in the fence, Maria has a brilliant idea. Here is a heartwarming tale of families and the miracle of love.

    The Best Mother by C. M. Surrisi

    A little girl named Maxine goes in search of trying to find the “best mother” – a mom better than her own.  She’s tired of her mom telling her to do things like brush her teeth or comb her hair.  Maxine “interviews” several other moms at various locations, but in the end she realizes her mom is in fact the best mother of all.

    A Night Out With Mama by Quvenzhané Wallis
    A very talented little girl has the pleasure of going with her Mama to her very first fancy awards show. She’ll get to wear her blue shoes along with her matching dress and headband, ride in a limousine and of course, eat lots of ice cream.  There are themes of: family, confidence, overcoming fears, love, mother-daughter bonding, glitz and glamour.  An absolutely adorable book with gorgeous illustrations for mothers and daughters to enjoy reading together!

    How Mamas Love Their Babies by Juniper Fitzgerald
    How Mamas Love Their Babies is written by a mother who is a former stripper who did what she had to in order to make ends meet for her baby.  The book illustrates the myriad ways that mothers provide for their children―piloting airplanes, washing floors, or dancing at a strip club.  It provides an expanded notion of working mothers and challenges the idea that only some jobs result in good parenting. We’re reminded that, while every mama’s work looks different, every mama works to make their baby’s world better.

    Jonathan and His Mommy by Irene Smalls
    I absolutely love this sweet story about a little boy named Jonathan and his mom spending the day together exploring their neighborhood!

    Mama’s Saris by Pooja Makhijani

    A young Indian girl is about to celebrate her seventh birthday so her mother lets her choose which sari she wants to to wear.  This book is so cute for girls who love playing dress up with their mother’s clothes.  The author’s note at the beginning of the book provides lots of good information related to saris that readers who ware unfamiliar with the culture may find useful.  There is also a helpful glossary of terms that defines some of the Indian words used throughout.  I love the bond that the mother and daughter share.

    Hush: A Thai Lullaby by Mingfrong Ho

    A beautiful rhyming tale set in Thailand that features a mother trying to keep all of the animals in the forest quiet so they won’t wake her sleeping baby.

    Tiara’s Hat Parade by Kelly Starling Lyons, illustrated by Nicole Tadgell

    This is a heartwarming mother/daughter story about family, community, hardship, and following your dreams. It also pays tribute to the inspiring African American tradition of hat making. The back matter contains an author’s note and additional information about three famous Black milliners: Vanilla Beane, Mae Reeves and Mildred Blount

    Lala Salama: A Tanzanian Lullaby by Patricia MacLachlan

    This beautifully illustrated book tells the story of a family that lives near a lake in Tanzania.  Lala Salama means “good night” in Swahili.  A soothing bedtime story for little ones.

    Lullaby (For a Black Mother) by Langston Hughes

    With a few simple words as smooth as a song, the poet Langston Hughes celebrates the love between an African American mother and her baby.

    Bedtime Bonnet by Nancy Redd, illustrated by Nneka Myers

    Every night when the sun goes down, this whole bonnet wearing family’s hair goes up. There are durags, wraps, wave caps, and more.

    In this first-ever picture book celebrating Black culture and bedtime hair traditions, a little girl can’t find her bedtime bonnet. She needs it to protect her hair from tangles while she sleeps, but where can it be? Each family member gets involved helping the girl until she finally finds it.

    Cora Cooks Pancit by Lazo Gilmore

    Cora finally gets her chance to assist her mom in the kitchen. They’re making pancit (pan-SEET), a popular Filipino noodle dish. When dinner is finally served, Cora anxiously awaits to see what everyone in her family thinks of her cooking. A recipe for pancit is included in the back of the book.

    Cancer Hates Kisses by Jessica Reid Sliwerski

    Chances are you know at least one person who has been affected by cancer. Maybe that one person is you.  This upbeat picture book is fantastic for helping children understand and cope with all the ups and downs that come with a parent who has cancer. I love how they refer to their mom as a cancer-fighting superhero! All of the different stages of cancer are mentioned: diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. Extra points for having a portion of all proceeds of this book being donated to the American Cancer Society. All the hearts for this gem!

    Grandma’s Purse by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

    What’s inside Grandma Mimi’s purse?  Pure Magic!  This is such an adorable book perfect for reading with Grandma on Mother’s Day, Grandparent’s Day or anytime of the year.  You’ll never know what treasures you’ll find hiding inside of grandma’s purse.

    Mango, Abuela and Me by Meg Medina

    Little Mia finds out that her grandmother is moving out of her sunny house with parrots and palm trees to come and live in the city with her and her parents. Mia isn’t too thrilled about this because her grandmother only speaks Spanish. This is a delightful story about love, learning, friendship, patience, and learning a new language.  Fun for reading with grandma on Mother’s Day, Grandparents Day or any time of the year.

    The Seven Silly Eaters by Mary Ann Hoberman

    This is one of my favorite picture books starring a strong mom, Mrs. Peters.  I love her story and the resolution– and I adore Marla Frazee’s illustrations!  Oh, and seriously, that is a lot of quality rhyming!

    Mommy, Mama, and Me by Leslea Newman

    Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with its mommies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there’s no limit to what a loving family can do together.  Shares the loving bond between same-sex parents and their children.

    My Two Moms and Me by Michael Joosten, illustrated by Izak Zenou

    Families with same-sex parents are celebrated in this board book that follows busy moms and their kids throughout their day—eating breakfast, going on a playdate, heading to the pool for a swim, and settling back in at night with a bedtime story and a good-night lullaby. LGBTQ+ parents and their friends and families will welcome this inclusive and cheerful book that reflects their own lives and family makeup.

    Floating On Mama’s Song / Flotando en la cancion de mama by Laura Lacamara and Yuyi Morales
    Anita’s mama loves to sing. She sings such beautiful, happy songs that something magical happens: Everyone who hears her music floats high above the ground. But then Mama stops singing. Can Anita find a way to bring back happy times and magical moments for her family?

    Up: How Families Around the World Carry Their Little Ones by Susan Hughes

    Around the world, little ones are carried in many different ways: in slings, on shoulders, in backpacks, on hips, in baskets, and in loving arms. Up! depicts ten places around the world, from Afghanistan to northern Canada, Peru to West Africa. In each place, a mom, dad, grandparent, aunt, uncle, cousin, or sibling lovingly carries a baby.

    Catch a Kiss by Deborah Diesen

    Little Izzie tells her mom to blow her a kiss, then another, and yet another. But when Izzie goes to “catch” the third kiss she misses and her kiss flies away never to be found again or will it?  I like how comforting, loving, playful and reassuring the mother is in this book. I think it beautifully showcases the sweet bond between a mother and daughter.  Izzie’s mother also tells little readers the secret of kisses: “No matter how far they have to go, no matter what they have to get through, and even if they get lost along the way, Mama-kisses ALWAYS come find you.”

    Hats Off To You by Karen Beaumont

    An adorable story with a nice tribute to mothers at the end. Perfect for little fashionistas who like to play dress up or a mother daughter book club with little girls ages 4-8.

    Welcome Song for Baby by Richard Van Camp

    From renowned First Nations storyteller Richard Van Camp comes a lyrical lullaby for newborns.

    Sweetest Kulu by Celina Kalluk

    This beautiful bedtime poem, written by acclaimed Inuit throat singer Celina Kalluk, describes the gifts given to a newborn baby by all the animals of the Arctic.

    My Mama is a Mechanic by Doug Cenko

    Snuggle with Mom for this sweet book about a mother as seen through her son’s eyes. To him, she is a surgeon when she repairs his favorite stuffed animal, a chemist when in the kitchen, and an architect when they play with toy blocks. But no matter what happens, she is always his mama, and that’s the most important thing of all!

    Babymoon by Hayley Barrett, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

    In this rhyming book, readers meet a sweet family (a biracial family of color) who decide to go on a secluded babymoon with their newborn baby.

    A Ride on Mother’s Back: A Day of Baby Carrying Around the World by Emery Bernhard

    Through a steamy rain forest in Brazil, along a river in Papua New Guinea, across a frozen inlet in the arctic, this book takes young children on a far-reaching journey to discover how babies worldwide are carried and what they see from their unique vantage points.

    When I Carried You in My Belly by Thrity Umrigar

    A super sweet and beautiful book about a mother sharing details about how she prepared for motherhood prior to her daughter being born.  I love how different members of the family are represented showing them all having a part in the arrival of the sweet baby girl.

    Read for Me, Mama by Vashanti Rahaman, illustrated by Lori McElrath-Eslick

    Thursday is library day, Joseph’s favorite day at school. Joseph loves books, and Thursday the librarian lets him take two books home: an easy book that he can read by himself and a harder book that someone can read for him. Joseph would love nothing more than to have Mama read for him. But it seems that Mama is always too busy. Then after supper one Saturday night, Joseph takes his book to the rocking chair where Mama is sitting and asks her to read for him. Mama begins to cry. The Truth is that Mama doesn’t know how to read.

    Happy Mother’s Day to all the mothers out there who celebrate!

    Your turn:  What are some of your favorite children’s books starring moms and grandmothers?  Feel free to share in the comments.

    Share:
    a book and a craft, children's books, diverse books

    Tiara’s Hat Parade: Hat at Home Activities Printables

    Hat at Home Activities: Tiara's Hat Parade

    We are so excited to join the virtual hat parade to celebrate the picture book Tiara’s Hat Parade written by Kelly Starling Lyons, illustrated by Nicole Tadgell.

    About the Book

    Tiara’s mom has a gift for making hats. Ladies come from all over to visit her studio Tracy Rose Millinery to try on her beautiful creations. She makes all types of hats, but specializes in fancy church hats and hats for special occasions.

    When a new store opens with hats that cost way less than Momma’s, it causes Tracy Rose Millinery to close down its business. Momma packs away all of her fabric, tucks her hats back into their boxes and sets her dreams aside. She decides to begin teaching art classes again at her daughter’s school.

    Tiara can see how sad her mother is. Can she help Momma understand how much her hats mean to the community and bring back the magic?

    This is a heartwarming mother/daughter story about family, community, hardship, and following your dreams. It also pays tribute to the inspiring African American tradition of hat making. The back matter contains an author’s note and additional information about three famous Black milliners: Vanilla Beane, Mae Reeves and Mildred Blount. Tiara’s Hat Parade published April 1, 2020 from Albert Whitman. Ages 4 – 8 and up.

    Virtual Hat Parade Finale

    On April 11, 2020 the virtual hat parade finale will include a reading of the book, video peeks at the illustration process, interview with trailblazing milliner Vanilla Beane, prizes, printables for kids courtesy of Here Wee Read and more. RSVP for the virtual finale event here.

    Buy your copy at Indiebound.org or Amazon.com
    Visit site of author Kelly Starling Lyons
    Visit site of illustrator Nicole Tadgell
    Tiara’s Hat Parade is dedicated to Black milliners (hat makers) and the kids they dazzle and inspire.

    Download the FREE Hat at Home Activities Printables

    This printable activity pack includes: a hat making activity, word search and discussion questions inspired by the picture book Tiara’s Hat Parade.

    Click here to download the printables for FREE. Enjoy!

    Printables designed by: Whimsical Designs by CJ, LLC.

    Hat at Home Activities:  Tiara's Hat Parade
    Hat at Home Activities: Tiara's Hat Parade
    Share:
    children's books, children's literacy

    Storyville: A Reading Journal for Kids Ages 5 – 12

    What do you do with an idea? Where do you let your ideas take you? Do you generally act on your ideas or put them on the back burner and eventually forget about them?

    Two years ago, I had an idea to create my own reading journal for kids to help keep track of the books they were reading. I began working with a talented illustrator who I found online to bring my first reading journal to life.

    The end result is Storyville, a full-color 138 page reading journal filled with enough space to log up to 60 books. Plus, there is additional space in the back for activities, extra drawing and writing space, and additional lists. I’m thrilled to finally share this journal with the general public that I’ve kept under wraps for the past two years.

    Right now, you can purchase a printable download of my Storyville journal on the Teachers Pay Teachers website.

    The purpose of this journal is two fold: to help promote lifelong reading habits and help maintain a reading routine. It’s recommended for ages 5-12, but can be used by anyone at home or in a classroom setting.

    My kids enjoy using their journal to document their reading journey. It’s so fun to watch them use it and think critically to either write or draw their thoughts for each book they read. The activities in the back matter add an additional element of fun with word searches, book bingo and extra space for notes, drawing and writing.

    Storyville: A Reading Journal for Little Bookworms Ages 5 - 12

    We like to keep our journal in a central location in our home and encourage the kids to write/draw in it at least once a day.

    People who use this journal can:

    * Write their own questions about the story.
    * Record observations about the characters and events.
    * Make predictions about where the story is going and how it will end.
    * Note favorite moments and quotes from the story.
    * Draw pictures of favorite characters and scenes.
    * Complete an activity in the activities section

    When your journal is done, you’ll have a wonderful memory book of your family’s reading adventures that you can treasure for years to come!

    So the next time you have an idea: draw it out on paper, write it down, share it with a friend, research the details, do anything you can right now to see that your ideas are pursued and don’t end up at the bottom of your ideas stack or to-do items.

    I hope this encourages you to go forth and act upon your next big idea.

    Happy Reading and Journaling!

    To purchase a printable copy of Storyville: A Reading Journal for Little Bookworms Ages 5 – 12 click here.

    Share:
    children's books, children's literacy, family fun, read aloud

    20 Black Parents to Follow on Instagram Who Instill a Love of Reading in Their Children

    20 Black Families to Follow on Instagram Who Instill a Love of Reading in Their Children

    As a parent, I’m obsessed with cultivating a love of reading in my children. It’s one of my favorite things about my parenthood journey thus far. Before becoming a parent, I read countless books and studies that have proven the many benefits of reading. I knew before having children that I wanted to instill a love of reading in them starting at birth. I take pride in seeing how well both of my children read (and write) and how they often choose to pick up a book and read on their own without being told to.

    When it comes to children, the ideal time to begin sharing books with them is during infancy, even as young as six weeks old (or sooner). From early on, children should own books, be read to often and see others reading and writing.  Children are rapidly learning language.  They often quadruple the number of words they know between the ages of 1-2.  Therefore, as parents and caregivers it’s crucial to read aloud with them often to increase their vocabulary.

    Below I’ve rounded up 20 Black parents I follow on Instagram who value reading and work to instill a love of reading in their children. These parents get it and understand the importance of establishing a reading habit with their children early on. I thought some of you may be interested in following some of these people as well for inspiration, tips and Black family joy!

    1. Me @hereweeread

    2. @jeanellnicolereads

    3. @rattlesandheels

    4. @mymotherhoodmagic

    5. @_colorful_stories

    6. @justmeomaya

    7. @imsuzettesays

    8. @readlikearockstar

    9. @apron_education

    10. @schoolathomeandbeyond

    11. @polishedplayhouse

    12. @puzzlehuddle

    13. @rahmarodaah

    14. @thevitamindproject

    15. @mayasbooknook

    16. @mommyweek

    17. @firstname.basis

    18. @twolightsacademy

    19. @arethoseyourkids

    20. @mybusybeesandme

    Your turn: Did this list help you discover new people to follow? Who are some of your favorite Black parents to follow on Instagram who value the importance of reading with their children? Feel free to share in the comments as I’m always looking for new like-minded people to connect with.

    Share:
    children's books, family fun

    31 Days of Women’s History: Download this Printable To Celebrate Women (and Girls) Who Persisted

    March is Women’s History Month – a time to celebrate the accomplishments of women trailblazers and also inspire a new generation of young women and men. How do you plan to celebrate Women’s History Month this year? I hope some of you will take time this month to post about women on social media, share women’s stories with family and friends, and ensure that women’s impact on history and society is valued and commemorated.

    31 Days of Women's History Printable

    Just like last month for our Black History Month printable, we are celebrating again with another coloring printable!

    To create this printable, I collaborated with Briana James of Notebooks and Nibbles, a talented Art student who reached out to me on Instagram and Latoria Williams from 1FirstCashAdvance online lending company, an open-heart woman who loves to support people. She’s currently building up her portfolio and asked to collaborate. I gladly accepted her offer after seeing her amazing work! Get in touch with Briana, give her a follow on Instagram, and support her as she continues to build up her art portfolio. It was such a pleasure to work with her and help support her at the same time.

    This coloring printable is a fun way to celebrate 31 days of diverse, inspirational, female leaders. It features women and girls who are strong and brave leaders, authors, politicians, inventors, humanitarians, women’s rights activists, and activists for other causes. You can enjoy this coloring page printed in various sizes from 8.5 X 11 up to 24 X 36 if you’d like jumbo poster size.

    Each day during the month of March (or any time of the year), color in one woman until the whole poster is complete. If there are books written about any the women, feel free to read them on your own or with your little readers. Otherwise, take time to research any of the women you may not be familiar with.

    31 Days of Women's History Printable

    Some of the women featured include: Jacqueline Woodson, Anna May Wong, Maria Tallchief, Serena Williams, Michelle Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Wangari Maathai, Jazz Jennings, Mari Copeny, Michelle Wie and more!

    Happy Reading & Researching!

    CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THIS PRINTABLE!

    CHECK OUT MORE OF MY RESOURCES (INCLUDING MY POPULAR PRINTABLE READING JOURNAL) ON MY NEW TEACHER’S PAY TEACHERS WEBSITE AND GIVE ME A FOLLOW OVER THERE TOO.

    AS ALWAYS, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

    Share:
    black history, children's books

    Women Supporting Women: How 4 Women Authors Are Supporting Each Other

    Don’t underestimate the power of women connecting and supporting each other in the literary world. I’m thrilled by the rise of authors committed to supporting each others work instead of competing.

    Traditionally we have been taught to be competitive with one another and fight our way to the top to be the “best” by any means necessary. However, the truth is that raising each other up and channeling the power of collaboration is truly how we’ll evoke change—and have a lot more fun along the way.

    Four women authors who all released picture books in January and February 2020 banded together a couple of years ago, vowed to support one another, and form a support group.

    Beth AndersonLizzie Demands a Seat! Rita Lorraine HubbardThe Oldest Student How Mary Walker Learned to Read Nancy ChurninBeautiful Shades of Brown: The Art of Laura Wheeler Waring and Vivian KirkfieldMaking Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe. Each of their books feature strong women engendering change as they find their voices through film, music, art, education, and action. 

    Beth Anderson: Lizzie Demands a Seat! Rita Lorraine Hubbard: The Oldest Student How Mary Walker Learned to Read Nancy Churnin: Beautiful Shades of Brown: The Art of Laura Wheeler Waring and Vivian Kirkfield: Making Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe.


    Beth Anderson loves digging into history and culture for undiscovered gems, exploring points of view, and playing with words. A former English as a Second Language teacher who has always marveled at the power of books, she is drawn to stories that open minds, touch hearts, and inspire questions. Born and raised in Illinois, she now lives in Loveland, Colorado. Author of AN INCONVENIENT ALPHABET (S&S 2018) and LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT (Boyds Mills & Kane, 2020), Beth has more historical gems on the way. 

    Rita Lorraine Hubbard is a former special education teacher and the author of THE OLDEST STUDENT (Schwartz & Wade, 2020), HAMMERING FOR FREEDOM (Lee and Low, 2018), and AFRICAN AMERICANS OF CHATTANOOGA (The History Press, 2008). A native of Chattanooga, Tennessee, she has made the celebration of unsung heroes her passion, and her work appears in The Tennessee Women Project and Salem Press’ Great American Lives: African American.  

    Nancy Churnin’s eight picture book biographies have won the Sydney Taylor Notable, South Asia Book Award, Anne Izard Storytellers Choice Award and Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, been honored on numerous state reading lists and been translated into Japanese, Korean, Braille and multiple languages in India, Sri Lanka and South Africa. A former theater critic for The Dallas Morning News, Nancy is an alumna of Harvard, with a masters from Columbia. She lives in North Texas.  

    Vivian Kirkfield loves bringing history alive for young readers. A former kindergarten teacher with a masters in Early Childhood Education, her non-fiction picture books include SWEET DREAMS, SARAH: FROM SLAVERY TO INVENTOR (Creston Books, 2019) and MAKING THEIR VOICES HEARD: THE INSPIRING FRIENDSHIP OF ELLA FITZGERALD AND MARILYN MONROE (Little Bee Books, 2020). Born and raised in New York City, Vivian has lived in the Litchfield Hills of Connecticut, the wide open spaces of Colorado, and now resides in the quaint little village of Amherst, New Hampshire, where the old stone library is her favorite hangout and her grandson is her favorite board game partner.

    If you are a current or aspiring writer, I hope this new trend of supporting your fellow authors resonates with you. Understand you can promote your own work and still take the time to support other writers and encourage their journeys. Remember that other writers are not your competition.

    Your turn: Have you read any of these amazing picture book biographies yet? What do you think about the idea of authors banding together to support each other? Feel free to share in the comments.

    Women Supporting Women: How 4 Women Authors Are Supporting Each Other

     

    Share:
    diverse books, interviews

    Author Interview: Up Close and Personal with Brandy Colbert

    Have you read any of Brandy Colbert’s books yet?

    In March 2020, Brandy Colbert will release her middle-grade debut, THE ONLY BLACK GIRLS IN TOWN – a powerful story (on Apple Books’ Most Anticipated Middle Grade Reads of 2020 list) about the only two black girls in town who discover a collection of hidden journals revealing shocking secrets of the past. A master at writing literary, contemporary novels with a commercial appeal, Colbert has quickly become a go-to author for stories with strong elements of diversity and intersectionality.

    I recently had the pleasure of asking Brandy a series of bookish questions in an interview. Check out the highlights below including all of her book recommendations and upcoming tour dates.

    What was the inspiration for your forthcoming book, The Only Black Girls in Town?  What messages/lessons do you hope people come away with after reading it?

    As a person who grew up as one of very few black kids in their school in a predominantly white town in the Midwest, I think a lot about kids who are going through the same thing now. One day I thought about what would happen if you were pretty much the only black girl in a tiny town, and then suddenly another black girl moved in across the street. I really wrote it for me and people who’ve been in or are going through that experience, because it’s such a specific situation to be in. I was so relieved when I got a bit older and realized I wasn’t the only one who’d grown up like that. I never write books with a message or lesson in mind, but I do hope that people who don’t have that experience will think about what it would be like to feel so isolated, and yet on display at the same time. Family also plays a big part in the story. I hope people will open their minds to all the different types of families that are out there.

    Have you always been interested in reading and writing?

    Yes, they’ve both been a big part of my life since I can remember. We always had a lot of books around the house when I was growing up, and we took regular trips to the library and bookstore, so I was always surrounded by literature. And I’ve loved storytelling from a young age, too; I’ve been writing since the age of 7.

    What were some of your favorite subjects growing up in school?

    I loved English and spelling, and I guess I’ve always had the same interests, because I grew up to be a writer, and a copy editor for magazines and books. I also really loved my journalism classes in high school; I worked on the yearbook staff and then went on to earn a journalism degree in college. 

    What are some of your must-have adult books for a home library?

    Anything and everything by Colson Whitehead, Zadie Smith, and Curtis Sittenfeld; Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward; Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram X Kendi; The Mothers by Brit Bennett; Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff; The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander; An American Marriage by Tayari Jones; A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

    Besides writing, what are some of your other hobbies or interests?

    Like writing, I’ve been tap dancing since I was young, and I still love it. I also enjoy cooking, baking, television and movies, trying to keep my indoor and outdoor plants alive, and spending time with friends.

    Do you have a favorite book that you have written?  If so, what is it and why?

    It’s always hard for me to answer this question, because I truly love all of my books for different reasons. I would say maybe The Revolution of Birdie Randolph, because it was a real joy to work on from beginning to end. Readers seem to really connect with Birdie, and I love that a specific coming-of-age story about a black girl living in Chicago can mean something to so many people.

    Any advice for aspiring writers and authors?

    Shut out the noise, keep your head down, and do the work. Don’t compare yourself to other writers. Remember that publishing is a long game. These are things I still have to remind myself of regularly; publishing is not an easy or predictable business.

    Name an adult book that:

    a) Inspired you 

    Drinking Coffee Elsewhere by ZZ Packer

    b) Made you laugh out loud 

    Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino

    c) You recommend to others often

    Dominicana by Angie Cruz

    What books are on your nightstand or e-reader right now?

    Too many! I never used to read multiple books at once, and now I can’t seem to stop. I’m currently reading The Yellow House by Sarah Broom, and the ones on my nightstand right now are Florida by Lauren Groff, Heavy by Kiese Laymon, Bloom by Kevin Panetta and Savanna Ganucheau, Damsel by Elana K. Arnold, and Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid.

    Are you working on any special projects that you want to share with others?

    My next book, The Voting Booth, will be out July 7, from Disney-Hyperion. It’s a YA novel set over the course of 12 hours, on Election Day, from the dual points of view of two black first-time teen voters, Duke and Marva. It covers a lot of topics, from grief to voter suppression to activism, and I’m excited for people to read it! I’m also currently working on a few projects that I hope to be able to talk about soon. 

    How can people get in touch with you on social media or on your website?

    My website, brandycolbert.com, lists all of the different people to contact if someone needs to reach me, or they can fill out a submission form that goes directly to me. I am also on Twitter and Instagram, both at the handle @brandycolbert. 

    Brandy Colbert’s 2020 Tour Dates

    March 7: BAM! Book Festival (West Palm Beach, FL)

    March 13-14: Tucson Festival of Books (Tucson, AZ)

    March 15-17: Children’s Literature Festival (Warrensburg, MO)

    March 21: Skylight Books (1818 N. Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA) at 3:00 pm

    In conversation with Nina LaCour (author of We Are Okay and Hold Still)

    March 26: Brazos Bookstore (2421 Bissonnet Street, Houston, TX 77005) at 6:30 pm

    In conversation with Liara Tamani (author of Calling My Name)

    March 29: East City Bookshop (645 Pennsylvania Ave SE #100, Washington, D.C.) at 5:00 pm. Brandy will also be in conversation with Leah Henderson (author of One Shadow on the Wall).

    March 30: Loyalty Bookstore (823 Ellsworth Drive, Silver Spring, MD) at 5:00 pm. Brandy will also be in conversation with bookstagrammer @SpinesVines.

    March 31: Books of Wonder (217 W 84th St, New York, NY) at 6:00 pm

    In conversation with Karyn Parsons (author of How High the Moon)

    April 16: Vroman’s Bookstore (695 E. Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA) at 7:00 pm

    In conversation with Mary Cecilia Jackson (author of Sparrow)

    April 18-19: The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books (Los Angeles, CA)

    June 6: Bronx Book Festival (The Bronx, NY)

    June 7 | 10:30 AM The Center for Fiction 15 Lafayette Ave. Brooklyn, NY

    In conversation with Renée Watson (author of Ways to Make Sunshine)

    June 7 3:00 PM Bank Street Bookstore 2780 Broadway New York, NY

    In conversation with Renée Watson (author of Ways to Make Sunshine)

    About Brandy Colbert

    Brandy Colbert
    Photo Credit: Little Brown Books for Young Readers


    Brandy Colbert is the critically acclaimed author of the novels PointeFinding YvonneThe Revolution of Birdie Randolph, and Stonewall Award winner Little & Lion. Born and raised in Springfield, Missouri, she now lives and writes in Los Angeles.

    Author Interview with Brandy Colbert
    Author interview with Brandy Colbert
    Share:

Warning: Use of undefined constant custom_pagination - assumed 'custom_pagination' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/herewe10/public_html/wp-content/themes/primrose/index.php on line 39