Follow:
Browsing Tag:

diverse books

    diverse books

    Diversity in Publishing from A to Z: A List of Book Publishers Who Specialize in Diversity and Inclusion

    While diversity in publishing has been at the forefront of some conversations in the publishing industry as of late, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done.  It’s no secret the publishing remains a majority White middle-class dominated industry.  For example, according to Lee and Low’s Diversity Gap in Children’s Books annual survey, Black, Latinx, and Native authors combined wrote just 7% of new children’s books published in 2018.

    So the question remains, what can we (the general public) do to help?

    One of the most important things we can do is support, read and help promote minority voices and diverse/inclusive books and the publishers who create them.  This includes purchasing books from independent bookstores or online and borrowing books from your local library.  If your bookstore or library doesn’t have the book you are looking for request it so they know there is a demand. If you don’t have the budget to buy books, use the library.

    Oftentimes, I request my local libraries to order books, even if we already own it or I plan to buy a copy for our home collection.  This way it will be added to the library’s collection and someone who can’t afford it will have the chance to read it.  I think of it as a nice way to pay it forward to others and still support diverse literature.

    Below I’ve rounded up a list of book publishers who support and specialize in publishing diverse and inclusive books.  While I’m aware many of the larger publishing houses also publish diverse books, this list focuses on: some larger publishers who exclusively publish diverse books, diverse imprints of larger publishing houses, and some smaller/independent publishers who publish diverse books.  You can find most of these publishers on social media including: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter.  If you find a new publisher from this list, give them a follow!

    Agate Bolden – Publishes adult and children’s books that focus on African American writers, fiction and nonfiction.
    Amistad – The oldest publisher dedicated to multicultural voices.  Publishes picture books through young adult works by and about people of African descent that discuss historical and cultural themes.  An imprint of HarperCollins.
    Baobab Publishing – An independent publishing company that specializes in creating quality multicultural children’s books.
    Barefoot Books – Publishes books that “open windows to other cultures and perspectives, while also providing children of all backgrounds and abilities with a much-needed mirror of their own experiences.”
    Beach House Publishing – Publishes board, picture and chapter books that caters to Hawaiian children
    Bharat Babies – Publishes children’s books about India with a story for everyone.
    Brown Girls Books – Publishes adult and children’s books written by Black female authors. Black owned.
    Caribbean Reads – Publishes children’s and adult books that feature Caribbean authors and/or Caribbean themes.
    Cassava Republic Press – Publishes fiction and non-fiction books for adults and children specializing in catering to African writing.
    Cinco Puntos – With roots on the U.S./Mexico border, Cinco Puntos publishes great books which make a difference in the way you see the world.
    Denene Millner Books – An imprint of Agate Publishing that publishes books specifically for children of color
    Feminist Press – Publishes books to amplify women’s rights and feminist perspectives
    Flamingo Rampant – Publishes feminist, racially-diverse, LGBTQ+ positive children’s books
    Groundwood Books – A publisher committed to publishing books for and about children whose experiences of the world are under-represented elsewhere.
    Highwater Press – Publishes a broad range of authentic Indigenous-authored stories. A rich mix of novels, graphic novels, and children’s books, these captivating and exceptional award-winning titles will challenge and engage readers of all ages.
    Inhabit Media – An inuit-owned publishing company that aims to promote and preserve the stories, knowledge and talent of northern Canada.
    Interlude Press – An award-winning boutique publisher of LGBTQ+ general and romantic fiction.
    Just Us Books – Publishes books for children of color
    Kamehameha Publishing – Publishes adult and children’s books that amplify Hawaiian perspectives, culture and language.
    KitaabWorld – A publishing company passionate about making South Asian children’s literature more accessible and easily available in the US.  They advocate to spread awareness about South Asian culture, and provide resources for teachers, librarians and parents.
    Kokila – An imprint of Penguin Random House that brings together an inclusive community of authors and illustrators, publishing professionals, and readers to examine and celebrate stories that reflect the richness of our world.  They publish children’s and young adult books.
    Lantana Publishing – Publishes award-winning diverse and inclusive children’s books that celebrate children in the UK school system who identify as Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME).
    Lee and Low Books – The largest publisher of award-winning diverse board, picture and chapter books for children.  Lee and Low makes a special effort to work with unpublished authors and illustrators of color.
    Lil’ Libros – Promotes bilingualism and Latin American culture through picture board books.
    Make Me a World – A forthcoming 2019 imprint that will publish books that “open up new worlds, possibilities, and pathways for young readers of all ages. Focused on bringing voices of diverse thinkers and artists from all walks of life” into the limelight.
    Marimba Books – A multicultural children’s book imprint of Just Us Books dedicated to publishing titles that reflect America’s diversity
    Melanin Origins – Publishes quality educational materials which inspire young minds to aspire for excellence while embracing their heritage.  Black owned.
    Nothing But the Truth Publishing – An independent publishing house specializing in books written by diverse female authors.
    Orca Book Publishers – An independently owned Canadian children’s book publisher who publishes award-winning diverse books
    Penny Candy Books – A small publishing house that honors diversity and fosters big conversations.
    Piñata Books – A publisher dedicated to the realistic and authentic portrayal of the themes, languages, characters and customs of Hispanic culture in the United States.
    Plum Street Press – A New Orleans based publisher that publishes books for children of color just being everyday kids
    Red Bone Press – Publishes work celebrating the cultures of black lesbians and gay men, and work that further promotes understanding between black gays and lesbians and the black mainstream.
    Read and Glow Books – A publishing company specializing in helping to empower and inspire children “to take pride in their individuality, and to see the beauty of their true selves”.  Black owned.
    Saffron Press – Publishes diverse books specializing in inspiring citizens of change
    Salaam Reads – A Muslim children’s book imprint from Simon & Schuster
    Sankofa Books – An imprint of Just Us Books dedicated to publishing out of print diverse children’s books
    Second Story Press – Publishes feminist-inspired books for young readers and adults
    Shade Mountain Press Specializes in literature written by women — particularly women of color, women with disabilities, women from working-class backgrounds, and women who identify queer/lesbian/bisexual.
    Stone Bridge Press – Publishes books about Asians with an emphasis on Japanese culture.
    The Road Runner Press – A publisher dedicated to publishing juvenile + adult titles by Native Americans.
    Third World Press – Publishes books for African-American children, young adults and adults. Black owned.
    Tiny Owl Publishing – Publishes high quality picture books promoting cultural diversity. Based in the UK.
    Tu Books – An imprint of Lee and Low Books that publishes diverse middle grade and YA books.
    Versify – An imprint of HMH books started by Newbery Award–winning author Kwame Alexander. Features diverse books for children and young adults.
    Yali Books – An independent publisher of picture books, young adult books and graphic novels with a focus on South Asian cultures.

    Your turn: Did you learn about any new publishers after reading this list?  What publishers would you add to this list?  Feel free to share in the comments.

    Share:
    black history, children's books, diverse books

    Black History Picture Book Bingo + Free Downloads!

    I am SO excited to share these Black History Picture Book Bingo cards with you!  When I came across author Kathy Ellen Davis’s Picture Book Bingo on Instagram, I immediately shared it with my Instagram audience.  I then reached out to Kathy and asked if she would create a Black History themed bingo card for me and she kindly said YES!

    If you’ve never played book bingo before, it’s pretty easy and straightforward.  Just read books to correspond with the categories on the card.  I’d recommend it for anyone who:

    • Enjoys reading
    • Likes reading new types of books they wouldn’t normally read
    • Likes to be challenged
    • Is a consistent and dedicated enough reader to complete the challenge

    Most of all, book bingo is about having FUN – even if you don’t complete the entire bingo card due to that thing called “life” we all live.  Really, though, if you enjoy books, I highly recommend giving this a shot at least one time through.  You can do it on your own, with your own children/grandchildren, other family members, friends or with your students.

    To create these bingo cards, I came up with different categories of books and Kathy was generous enough to hand letter them on her own!  I have a huge list of other categories that are not included on these cards so expect to see other versions of these bingo cards on occasion throughout the year.

    I think book bingo is a wonderful opportunity for kids (and adults) to have fun while reading, along with adding an extra incentive to complete the BINGO card.  Have you played book bingo before?

    Download the Black History Month Picture Book Bingo Card here

    Download the Black History Picture Book Bingo Card here

    Why two different versions?

    Use the Black History Month Picture Book Bingo card if you want to use it ONLY during the month of February which is Black History Month.

    Use the Black History Picture Book Bingo card if you want to use it any time during the year.

    Make sense?

    If you need book suggestions, you may want to browse some of my previous blog posts linked below:

    50+ Picture Book Biographies Featuring Males of African Descent

    9+ Black Inventors You May Have Missed In History Class

    Black History Books for 3, 4 & 5 Year-Olds

    29 Black Picture Books for Black History Month, Or Any Month

    18 Picture Books That Help Keep Dr. King’s Dream Alive


    Happy Reading!

     

     

    Your turn: Do you find these Bingo cards to be helpful?  Will you participate and try it?  Feel free to share in the comments.  I’d love to hear your thoughts and perhaps see photos of your completed Bingo cards!  If you share about this, use the hashtag #bhpbingo so I’ll see your posts.

    Share:
    black history, children's books, diverse books

    Let’s Hear It for the Boys: 50+ Picture Book Biographies to Read Year Round featuring Males of African Descent

    This round-up of picture books highlights prominent and a few lesser-known male leaders of African descent.  Each male featured has a distinct story and legacy, but they all share some commonalities: poise and confidence that no doubt added to their iconic statuses. I hope you’ll enjoy this list and explore each story to witness their perseverance through oppression and their determination through struggle.  These books are great to read during Black History Month or anytime of the year.

    Happy Reading!

    Art Tatum

    Art Tatum, an African American pianist, and one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time, was born in 1909, in Toledo, Ohio.  Did you know he was blind in one eye and visually impaired in the other?  He was an amazing child prodigy with perfect pitch who learned to play the piano by ear.

    Arturo Schomburg

    Arthur Schomburg was a Puerto Rican historian, writer, and activist in the United States who researched and raised awareness of the great contributions that Afro-Latin Americans and African-Americans have made to society.

    Barack Obama

    Barack Hussein Obama is an American attorney and politician who served as the 44th president of the United States from 2009 to 2017.

    Bass Reeves

    Bass Reeves was the first Black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi River. He worked mostly in Arkansas and the Oklahoma Territory.  During his long career, he was credited with arresting more than 3,000 felons. He shot and killed 14 outlaws in self-defense.

    Bob Marley

    Bob Marley was a powerful musician and messenger; a poet and prophet of reggae culture. His music echoed from Jamaica all the way across the globe, spreading his heartfelt message of peace, love, and equality to everyone who heard his songs.

    Carter G. Woodson

    Carter G. Woodson is known as The “Father” of Black History.  He dedicated his life to educating African Americans about the achievements and contributions of their ancestors.

    Charles White

    Born in Chicago in 1918, Charles W. White was one of America’s most renowned and recognized African-American & Social Realist artists.

    Charlie Sifford

    Charles Luther Sifford was a professional golfer who was the first African American to play on the PGA Tour.

    Claude Mason Steele

    Claude Mason Steele is an American social psychologist.  He is best known for his work on stereotype threat and its application to minority student academic performance.

    Clive Campbell

    Born in 1955 in Kingston, Jamaica, Clive Campbell is known as “The Father of Hip Hop”.

    Cornelius Washington

    Cornelius Washington was a veteran French Quarter sanitation worker who became famous following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    David Drake

    David Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, was an American potter who lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. Dave produced over 100 alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs between the 1820s and the 1860s.

    Dizzy Gillespie (John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie)

    John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer, and singer. Some call him one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all times.

    Ernie Barnes

    Ernie Barnes was an African-American painter, well known for his unique style of elongation and movement. He was also a professional football player, actor and author.  Did you know his popular paintings were featured in the sitcom Good Times?

    Frederick Douglass

    Famed 19th-century author and orator Frederick Douglass was an eminent human rights leader in the anti-slavery movement and the first African-American citizen to hold a high U.S. government rank.

    George Crum

    Meet George Crum, inventor of potato chips!

    George Fletcher

    George Fletcher was the first African American to compete for a world championship in bronco riding at the 1911 Pendleton Roundup.

    George Moses Horton

    George Moses Horton was an African-American poet from North Carolina, the first to be published in the Southern United States. His book The Hope of Liberty was published in 1829 while he was still enslaved.

    Gordon Parks

    A man of many talents, Gordon Parks is most famous for being the first Black director in Hollywood.

    Henry Brown

    Henry “Box” Brown was an enslaved man who shipped himself to freedom in a wooden box.

    Horace Pippin

    Horace Pippin was a self-taught African-American painter.

    Howard Thurman

    Howard Washington Thurman was a Black author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader.

    Jacob Lawrence

    Jacob Lawrence was one of the most important artists of the 20th century, widely renowned for his modernist depictions of everyday life as well as epic narratives of African American history and historical figures.

    Jackie Robinson

    Jackie Robinson broke boundaries as the first African American player in Major League Baseball. But long before Jackie changed the world in a Dodger uniform, he did it in an army uniform.

    James Madison Hemings

    Madison Hemings, born James Madison Hemings, was the son of the mixed-race enslaved Sally Hemings. He was the third of her four children— fathered by her master, President Thomas Jefferson.

    James Van Der Zee

    James Van Der Zee was an African-American photographer known for his distinctive portraits from the Harlem Renaissance.

    Jean-Michel Basquiat

    Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen.

    Jimmy “Wink” Winkfield

    Born into an African American sharecropping family in 1880s Kentucky, Jimmy Winkfield grew up loving horses. He later went on to become the last Black jockey to win the Kentucky Derby.

    John Coltrane

    John William Coltrane was an American jazz saxophonist and composer.

    John Lewis

    John Roy Lynch

    John Roy Lynch was the first African American Speaker of the House in Mississippi. He was also one of the first African American members of the U.S House of Representatives during Reconstruction, the period in United States history after the Civil War.

    Langston Hughes

    James Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist from Joplin, Missouri.

    Lonnie Johnson

    Meet the inventor of the Super Soaker Water Gun!

    Malcolm X

    Malcolm X was an American Muslim minister and human rights activist.

    Martin Luther King Jr.

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist during  the Civil Rights Movement.

    Michael Jordan

    Regarded by most as the NBA’s greatest all-time player, Michael Jordan won six titles with the Chicago Bulls.

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali was an American professional boxer, activist, and philanthropist. Nicknamed “The Greatest”, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest boxers of all time.

    Neil deGrasse Tyson

    Neil deGrasse Tyson, is an American astrophysicist whose work has inspired a generation of young scientists and astronomers to reach for the stars!

    Nelson Mandela

    Born on July 18, 1918 Nelson Mandela is best known for promoting messages of forgiveness, peace and equality.

    Paul Laurence Dunbar

    Born on June 27, 1872, Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the first African American poets to gain national recognition.

    Paul Robeson

    Paul Leroy Robeson was an American bass baritone concert artist and stage and film actor who became famous both for his cultural accomplishments and for his political activism.

    Ray Charles

    Ray Charles Robinson, known professionally as Ray Charles, was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and composer.

    Richard Wright

    Pioneering African-American writer Richard Wright is best known for the classic texts Black Boy and Native Son.

    Romare Bearden

    Romare Bearden was a visual artist who utilized painting, cartoons, and collage to depict African-American life.

    Thurgood Marshall

    Thurgood Marshall was an American lawyer, serving as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991. He was the Court’s 96th justice and its first African-American justice.

    Vivien Thomas

    Overcoming racism and resistance from his colleagues, Vivien ushered in a new era of medicine—children’s heart surgery. This book is the compelling story of this incredible pioneer in medicine.

    Wendell O. Scott

    Wendell Oliver Scott was the first African American race car driver to win a race in what would now be considered part of the Sprint Cup Series.

    William “Doc” Key

    William “Doc” Key, a formerly enslaved man and self-taught veterinarian believed in treating animals with kindness, patience, and his own homemade remedies.

    William “Bill” Lewis

    William “Bill” Lewis was an enslaved man who earned enough money being a blacksmith and set a daring plan in motion: to free his family.

    William J. Powell

    William J. Powell was an American businessman, entrepreneur, and pioneering golf course owner who designed the Clearview Golf Club, the first integrated golf course, as well as the first to cater to African-American golfers.

    Your turn: Did you learn about someone or something new after reading this post?  What other books would you add to this list?  Feel free to share in the comments.

    Share:
    black history, book reviews, children's books, diverse books, giveaways

    Black History Month: Waiting for Pumpsie + A Giveaway!

    waitingforpumpsie

    I received this book for free from Charlesbridge in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    Waiting for Pumpsie by Barry Wittenstein
    Published by Charlesbridge Format: Hardcover
    Source: Charlesbridge
    Buy on AmazonBuy on Indie Bound
    five-stars

    In 1959 the Boston Red Sox was the last team in the Major Leagues to integrate. But when they call Elijah “Pumpsie” Green up from the minors, Bernard is overjoyed to see a black player on his beloved home team. And, when Pumpsie’s first home game is scheduled, Bernard and his family head to Fenway Park. Bernard is proud of Pumpsie and hopeful that this historic event is the start of great change in America.

    This fictionalized account captures the true story of baseball player Pumpsie Green’s rise to the major leagues. The story is a snapshot of the Civil Rights Movement and a great discussion starter about the state of race relations in the United States today.

    Waiting for Pumpsie is based on a fictional character named Bernard and his family, but based on true events from Pumpsie Green’s life.

    All Pumpsie Green wanted to do was play baseball. He didn’t aspire to play for the major leagues initially, but he eventually went on to become the first Black baseball player to integrate the Boston Red Sox. Although Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball in 1947, it took the Red Sox another twelve years to integrate their team. They were the last team in Major League Baseball to have a Black player.

    This is an inspiring and feel good story about equality and change. Pumpsie Green is currently still alive today and is sometimes invited back to Fenway Park to throw out a ceremonial first pitch at Red Sox games.

    Click here to see a list of the first Black players for each Major League Baseball team.

    About the Author
    Barry has been a bartender, taxi driver, song writer, substitute teacher and writer for the Major League Baseball.  He grew up as a Mets fan and was eight years old when he first heard the name Pumpsie Green.  He lives in Manhattan with his wife and son.  Visit his website: onedogwoof.com.

    About the Illustrator
    London Ladd currently lives in Syracuse, New York.  He’s a graduate of Syracuse University with a BFA in Illustration. He has illustrated numerous critically acclaimed children’s books including March On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World (Scholastic), written by Christine King Farris, the older sister of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; Frederick’s Journey: The Life of Frederick Douglass (Disney/Jump at the Sun), written by Doreen Rappaport, and Midnight Teacher: Lilly Ann Granderson and her Secret School (Lee & Low Books), written by Janet Halfmann.  His goal is to open an art center in Syracuse so that young people and families can create their own art.  Visit his website: londonladd.com.

    The Giveaway!
    One (1) winner will receive a copy of Waiting for Pumpsie courtesy of Charlesbridge Publishing.  Open to all US based residents age 18 and over.  Good Luck!

    Waiting for Pumpsie Book Giveaway

    five-stars
    Share:
    book reviews, children's books, diverse books

    Hands Up! by Breanna J. McDaniel (A Book Review)

    I received this book for free from Penguin Kids in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    Hands Up! by Breanna J. McDaniel
    Published by Penguin Kids Format: Hardcover
    Source: Penguin Kids
    Buy on AmazonBuy on Indie Bound
    four-stars

    A young black girl lifts her baby hands up to greet the sun, reaches her hands up for a book on a high shelf, and raises her hands up in praise at a church service. She stretches her hands up high like a plane's wings and whizzes down a hill so fast on her bike with her hands way up. As she grows, she lives through everyday moments of joy, love, and sadness. And when she gets a little older, she joins together with her family and her community in a protest march, where they lift their hands up together in resistance and strength.

    Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

    Hands Up! by Breanna J. McDaniel, illustrated by Shane W. Evans

    If you look up the phrase “hands up” in many dictionaries, you’ll likely see a negative definition written.

    For example:

    ▪️an order given by a person pointing a gun.  Source: Collins dictionary
    ▪️to admit that something bad is true or that you have made a mistake. Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary
    ▪️to deliver (an indictment) to a judge or higher judicial authority.  Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary (By the way, do you know the history behind raising your right hand to testify in court? Look it up, I found it quite interesting.)

    This book shows a little Black girl named Viv putting her hands up in various everyday situations like: greeting the sun, playing peek-a-boo, raising hands in defense during a basketball game, raising hands in class, picking fruit off trees, and raising hands during praise and worship at church. In the end, readers see Viv a little older raising her hands in resistance and strength with a group of friends at a community protest march.

    With sparse text and lively illustrations, Hands Up! cleverly shows readers lifting your hands doesn’t always imply negativity. It gently encourages children to feel happy and confident to raise their hands. It also supports reticent kids in speaking up or standing up for what’s right.

    It was interesting and refreshing to be reminded of all the times we raise our hands throughout the day from stretching in the morning when we wake to reaching for something high on a shelf like a library book.  My personal favorite page is little Viv raising her hands in church demonstrating joy and praise to God through worship. Viv sets her power aside and praises God by physically and publicly demonstrating to Him that she needs Him which empowers her.

    The back matter has notes from the author and illustrator which explain why this book was written.

    I worry that this world casts Black kids as victims, villains, or simply adults before they’re grown up. – Breanna J. McDaniel

    This brilliant reminder from Breanna helped guide me back to lifting my hands in joy. – Shane W. Evans

    Hands Up! is available now online and where books are sold. Ages 4-8 and up.

    Your turn: Have you read this book yet?  Feel free to share in the comments.

    four-stars
    Share:
    book reviews, children's books, diverse books, multicultural children's book day

    Multicultural Children’s Book Day: Sweet Dreams, Sarah by Vivian Kirkfield (A Book Review)

    Disclaimer: I was sent a copy of this book from the author to share my review as part of Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2019.  As always, all opinions expressed are my own.  Thank you to the Multicultural Children’s Book Day Team for selecting me as a reviewer and a co-host!

    Sweet Dreams, Sarah: From Slavery to Inventor by Vivian Kirkfield, illustrated by Chris Ewald

    Publisher: Creston Books
    Format: Hardcover
    Pages: 32
    Age Range: 5 – 9
    Grade Level: Kindergarten – 4

    Synopsis
    Sarah E.Goode was one of the first African-American women to get a U.S. patent. Working in her husband’s furniture store, she recognized a need for a multi-use bed and through hard work, ingenuity, and determination, invented her unique cupboard bed. She built more than a piece of furniture. She built a life far away from slavery, a life where her sweet dreams could come true.

    Reflection
    Prior to reading Sweet Dreams, Sarah: From Slavery to Inventor I had never heard of Sarah E. Good before.  I can honestly say I was blown away to learn about this woman.  Why didn’t I learn about her and countless other inventors in school when I was growing up?  It just goes to show there are a myriad of inventions created by Black people that are still unbeknownst to many.  I’m so glad author Vivian Kirkfield decided to write this book and understands the importance to highlight contributions of African-Americans as inspiration for our present and our future.

    Born into slavery, inventor and entrepreneur Sarah E.Goode was the first African-American woman to be granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, for her invention of a folding cabinet bed on July 14, 1885.  When Sarah moved to Chicago later in life, that’s where she met her husband, Archibald Goode.  Her husband worked as a stair case builder and an upholsterer, and Sarah was the owner of a furniture store.


    Most of Sarah’s customers lived in very small houses or apartments with cramped spaces.  As a result, they couldn’t buy a lot of furniture since they complained that their homes couldn’t accommodate too many items.  This is what drove Sarah Goode to invent the folding cabinet bed.  She put on her thinking cap and went to work putting her masterful carpentry skills into full action.  The bed that Sarah invented doubled as both a desk and a bed.  Most importantly, it was compact which was exactly what her customers needed.

    I truly enjoyed reading about Sarah Goode’s story!  Not only was the story well written accompanied by vivid and lively illustrations, it was also engaging and highly inspiring too.  I loved Sarah’s drive and determination to press on in spite of the obstacles she faced and rejection letters she received.  I can only imagine how proud she must have felt to be the first Black woman to receive a U.S. patent for something that she created.  Glory!  Her idea filled a void in the lives of many, it was practical and many people appreciated it.  Kudos to Sarah for opening up the doorway for many women to come after her and obtain their own patents!


    The back matter of this book contains an author’s note, additional information about what a patent is, a timeline of Sarah Goode’s life and a handy timeline of Black women patent holders.

    Aspiring entrepreneurs, inventors and lovers of history are likely to be just as inspired by Sarah’s story as I was.  I’m thrilled to be able to share this story with my children and so many others in honor of Multicultural Children’s Book Day.  Look for Sweet Dreams, Sarah: From Slavery to Inventor when it publishes in May 2019.

    Your turn:  Have you ever heard of Sarah E. Goode prior to reading this review?  If you’re curious about other items invented by Black inventors, you might enjoy reading this blog post.

    Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2019 (1/25/19) is in its 6th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

    MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board!

    *View our 2019 Medallion Sponsors here: https://wp.me/P5tVud-
    *View our 2019 MCBD Author Sponsors here: https://wp.me/P5tVud-2eN

    Medallion Level Sponsors

    Honorary: Children’s Book CouncilThe Junior Library GuildTheConsciousKid.org.

    Super Platinum: Make A Way Media

    GOLD: Bharat BabiesCandlewick PressChickasaw Press, Juan Guerra and The Little Doctor / El doctorcitoKidLitTV,  Lerner Publishing GroupPlum Street Press,

    SILVER: Capstone PublishingCarole P. RomanAuthor Charlotte RiggleHuda EssaThe Pack-n-Go Girls,

    BRONZE: Charlesbridge PublishingJudy Dodge CummingsAuthor Gwen JacksonKitaab WorldLanguage Lizard – Bilingual & Multicultural Resources in 50+ LanguagesLee & Low BooksMiranda Paul and Baptiste Paul, RedfinAuthor Gayle H. Swift,  T.A. Debonis-Monkey King’s DaughterTimTimTom BooksLin ThomasSleeping Bear Press/Dow PhumirukVivian Kirkfield

    MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Author Sponsors on board

    Honorary: Julie FlettMehrdokht AminiAuthor Janet BallettaAuthor Kathleen BurkinshawAuthor Josh FunkChitra SoundarOne Globe Kids – Friendship StoriesSociosights Press and Almost a MinyanKaren LeggettAuthor Eugenia ChuCultureGroove BooksPhelicia Lang and Me On The PageL.L. WaltersAuthor Sarah StevensonAuthor Kimberly Gordon BiddleHayley BarrettSonia PanigrahAuthor Carolyn Wilhelm, Alva Sachs and Dancing DreidelsAuthor Susan BernardoMilind Makwana and A Day in the Life of a Hindu KidTara WilliamsVeronica AppletonAuthor Crystal BoweDr. Claudia MayAuthor/Illustrator Aram KimAuthor Sandra L. RichardsErin DealeyAuthor Sanya Whittaker GraggAuthor Elsa TakaokaEvelyn Sanchez-ToledoAnita BadhwarAuthor Sylvia LiuFeyi Fay AdventuresAuthor Ann MorrisAuthor Jacqueline JulesCeCe & Roxy BooksSandra Neil Wallace and Rich WallaceLEUYEN PHAMPadma VenkatramanPatricia Newman and Lightswitch LearningShoumi SenValerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, Traci SorellShereen RahmingBlythe StanfelChristina MatulaJulie RubiniPaula ChaseErin TwamleyAfsaneh MoradianLori DeMonia, Claudia Schwam, Terri Birnbaum/ RealGirls RevolutionSoulful SydneyQueen Girls Publications, LLC

    We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

    Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

    A Crafty ArabAgatha Rodi BooksAll Done MonkeyBarefoot MommyBiracial Bookworms, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms ShareColours of UsDiscovering the World Through My Son’s EyesDescendant of Poseidon ReadsEducators Spin on it Growing Book by BookHere Wee Read, Joy Sun Bear/ Shearin LeeJump Into a BookImagination Soup,Jenny Ward’s ClassKid World CitizenKristi’s Book NookThe LogonautsMama SmilesMiss Panda ChineseMulticultural Kid BlogsRaising Race Conscious ChildrenShoumi SenSpanish Playground

    TWITTER PARTY Sponsored by Make A Way Media: MCBD’s super-popular (and crazy-fun) annual Twitter Party will be held 1/25/19 at 9:00pm.E.S.T. TONS of prizes and book bundles will be given away during the party. GO HERE for more details.

    FREE RESOURCES From MCBD

    Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: http://bit.ly/1kGZrta

    Free Empathy Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teacher-classroom-empathy-kit/

    Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

    Share:
    black history, children's books, diverse books

    9+ Black Inventors You May Have Missed in History Class + Picture Book Recommendations


    We have all heard of Alexander Graham Bell, Charles Goodyear, Thomas Edison and other famous American inventors.  Right?  But you may not know that throughout American history, hundreds of Black inventors have also made significant contributions to almost every facet of life through their creations.  Many of the inventions we still use today!

    While researching different inventions for this blog post, I was shocked to discover some of the many incredible things that African Americans have invented, including the ice cream scoop, the ironing board, the lawn mower, and the mailbox!  Who knew?

    That’s right, for more than three centuries, Black inventors have been coming up with ingenious ideas that have changed the world for the better.  I hope this blog post helps brings their stories to life and shines a light on these courageous inventors and discoverers.

    Black shampoos and other hair care products (including the Straightening Comb)

    Inventor: Sarah Breedlove Walker a.k.a. Madam CJ Walker
    Picture Book Recommendation: Vision Of Beauty : The Story Of Sarah Breedlove Walker (Ages 8 – 12)

    Madam C.J. Walker was one of the first Black millionaires in the United States. She is commonly known for her Black beauty and Hair-care Empire and invention.

    Clock

    Inventor: Benjamin Banneker
    Picture Book Recommendation: Ticktock Banneker’s Clock (Ages 6-9)

    Did you know Benjamin Banneker a mathematician, and astronomer, taught himself mathematics through textbooks he borrowed?  As an adult, Benjamin used mathematics and astronomy to predict the weather and write his own almanac, which was used by farmers.  He also invented America’s first clock made of wood in 1753.

    Laserphaco Probe (for cataract treatment)

    Inventor: Dr. Patricia A. Bath
    Picture Book Recommendation: The Doctor with an Eye for Eyes: The Story of Dr. Patricia Bath (Ages 5 – 10)

    Did you know Dr. Patricia E. Bath, an Black doctor and inventor, invented the Laserphaco Probe that helps treat cataracts, a common cause of blindness?

    Lawn Mower

    Inventor: John Albert Burr
    Picture Book Recommendation: The Man Who Invented the Lawn Mower

    On May 9, 1899, John Albert Burr patented an improved rotary blade lawn mower. Burr designed a lawn mower with traction wheels and a rotary blade that was designed to not easily get plugged up from lawn clippings. John Albert Burr also improved the design of lawn mowers by making it possible to mow closer to building and wall edges.

    Helped to Popularize Peanut Butter

    (also developed hundreds of products using the peanut, sweet potatoes and soybeans. )
    Inventor: George Washington Carver
    Picture Book Recommendation: Who Was George Washington Carver? (Ages 8 – 12)

    George Washington Carver was an American agricultural chemist, agronomist and botanist who developed various products from peanuts, sweet potatoes and soy-beans that radically changed the agricultural economy of the United States.  George Washington Carver did not invent peanut butter, but he made it more popular.  The Aztec were known to have made peanut butter from ground peanuts as early as the 15th century. Canadian pharmacist Marcellus Gilmore Edson was awarded U.S. Patent 306,727 (for its manufacture) in 1884, 12 years before Carver began his work at Tuskegee.

    Potato Chips

    Inventor: George Crum
    Picture Book Recommendation: George Crum and the Saratoga Chip (Ages 6 – 10)

    The son of an African-American father and a Native American mother, George Crum was working as the chef in the summer of 1853 when he incidentally invented the chip. It all began when a patron who ordered a plate of French-fried potatoes sent them back to Crum’s kitchen because he felt they were too thick and soft.

    Pull Out Bed/Convertible Bed/Folding Cabinet Bed

    Inventor: Sarah E. Goode
    Picture Book Recommendation: Sweet Dreams, Sarah: From Slavery to Inventor (Ages 5 – 9)

    Born into slavery in 1850, inventor and entrepreneur Sarah E. Goode was the first African-American woman to be granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, for her invention of a folding cabinet bed in 1885. She died in 1905.

    Super Soaker Water Gun

    Inventor: Lonnie G. Johnson
    Picture Book Recommendation: Whoosh: Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions (Ages 7-10)

    Lonnie Johnson is an American inventor and engineer who holds more than 120 patents. He is the inventor of the Super Soaker water gun, which has been among the world’s bestselling toys every year since its release in 1982.

    Gas Mask, Traffic Light

    Inventor: Garrett A. Morgan
    Picture Book Recommendation: To the Rescue! Garret Morgan Underground (Ages 5-8)

    Garrett Morgan was an inventor and businessman from Cleveland who is best known for inventing a device called the Morgan safety hood which is now called a gas mask.  He also invented the 3 light traffic signal which is still used today.   After receiving a patent in 1923, the rights to the invention were eventually purchased by General Electric.

    Your turn: Check out this list of other items invented by Black inventors.  Which ones did you know about and which ones are you surprised to learn?  What Black inventors/inventions would you add to this list?  Feel free to share in the comments.

    3-DVG Glasses –  Kenneth J. Dunkley
    Farmer’s Almanac – Benjamin Banneker
    Automatic Elevator Doors – Alexander Miles
    Blood Bank – Dr. Charles Richard Drew
    Clothes Dryer – George T. Sampson
    CompuRest Keyboard Stand – Joanna Hardin (1993)
    Disposable Underwear – Tanya Allen (1994)
    Door Knob & Door Stop – Osbourn Dorsey (1878)
    Dry Cleaning Process – Thomas L. Jennings (He was also the first Black person to hold a U.S. patent)
    Dust Pan (improved version) – Lloyd P. Ray
    Egg Beater – Willis Johnson (1884)
    Fitted Bedsheets – Bertha Berman (1959)
    Folding Chair – John Purdy
    Gas Heating Furnace – Alice Parker
    Golf Tee – Dr. George Grant
    Guitar (modern) – Robert Fleming
    Hairbrush – Lyda A. Newman
    Home Security System – Marie Van Brittan Brown
    IBM Computer – Mark E. Dean (He was a co-creator)
    Ice Cream Scoop – Alfred L. Cralle (1897)
    Ironing Board – Sarah Boone
    Lawn Sprinkler – Joseph A. Smith
    Light Bulb (Improved version) – Lewis Latimer
    Mail Box – Phillip A. Downing (1891)
    “Monkey” Wrench – Jack Johnson (1922) (Nicknamed a “monkey” wrench because it was invented by a Black man)
    Mop – Thomas W. Stewart (1893)
    Pacemaker (improved version) – Otis Boykin
    Pastry Fork – Anna M. Mangin (1892)
    Portable Pencil Sharpener – John Lee Love
    Rain Hat – Maxine Snowden (1983)
    Refrigerating Apparatus – Thomas Elkins
    Reversible Baby Stroller – William H. Richardson
    Sanitary Belt – Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner
    Street Sweeper – Charles B. Brooks
    Suitcase with wheels and transporting hook – Debrilla Ratchford (1978)
    Thermostat and Temperature Control – Frederick Jones
    Toaster (with a digital timer)– Ruane Jeter
    Touch Tone Telephone (improved) – Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson (Dr. Jackson conducted breakthrough basic scientific research that enabled others to invent the portable fax, touch tone telephonesolar cells, fiber optic cables, and the technology behind caller ID and call waiting.)
    Toilet Tissue Holder (improved version) – Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner
    Video Game Console/Cartridge – Gerald “Jerry” Lawson
    Windshield Wipers – Mary Anderson (1903)

    Share: