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January 2017

    children's books, read aloud

    Read Aloud Book Club for Kids: February Chapter Book of the Month Selection

    Have you joined our Read Aloud Book Club for Kids yet?  This year I made a goal to read aloud more easy reader chapter books with my kids in addition to reading lots of picture books. So instead of keeping it to myself, I thought it would be fun to have others who may be interested join us!

    As the year goes on, I hope to expand this club with beyond the book activities and maybe a few other goodies. For now though, the goal is to just read aloud 1 easy reader chapter book per month.  This club will feature different easy to read diverse and inclusive chapter books to read aloud each month with the younger children in your home. Are you up to the challenge? Do you have a goal to read aloud daily with your kids? Join us!

    Here’s the second diverse chapter book we’ll be reading aloud:

    Museum Mysteries: The Case of the Missing Museum Archives by Steve Brezenoff

    Synopsis

    When the plans for the prototype of a failed flying machine go missing from the Air and Space Museum’s archives, Amal’s father, the assistant archivist, is blamed. No one suspects a crime has been committed ― except Amal and her friends. With her father’s job on the line, it’s up to them to track down the missing plans. Can Amal and her friends get to the bottom of the museum mystery before it’s too late?

    ***********************************************************

    This book is slightly longer than last month’s selection, but it’s less than 130 pages.  So, if you read an average of 4 – 5 pages aloud per day you and your kids should finish reading it by the end of February.  Also, this book is part of a diverse mystery series for young readers published by Capstone Young Readers!  If you like this book you may want to check out the others in the series like The Case of the Haunted History Museum.

    I hope some of you will join us next month and read along with your little readers.  Happy Reading!

    Your turn: What are some of your favorite easy reader chapter books for kids?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    book reviews, children's books, read aloud

    Read Your World: 9 Amazing Multicultural Books for Kids

    As a participant in the 4th annual Multicultural Children’s Book Day, I had the pleasure of receiving an amazing array of multicultural books from our friends at Capstone Young Readers to read with my children and share with all of you. Thank you, Capstone for your generosity and for sending so many wonderful picture books, early readers and chapter books!

    Capstone Young Readers creates entertaining and informative reading experiences that generate excitement and love for reading. Their products include board books, young readers, middle readers, graphic novels, nonfiction/reference, craft, how-to, drawing, and seasonal titles.  Be sure and check out their sister-site, CapstoneKids.com for tons of fun book-inspired games, quizzes and activities to keep young minds learning!

    Below is a list of the books we received.  Enjoy!

    When Penny Met Potus by Rachel Ruiz

    Little Penny couldn’t be more excited! She’s going to spend the day at work with her mom at the White House! Most importantly, she’s finally going to meet POTUS (an acronym for President of the United States).  Penny has no idea who POTUS is, what POTUS looks like or what POTUS actually means. She imagines POTUS to be a blue furry monster surrounded by secret service agents. Penny has high expectations for when she finally meets this POTUS.

    After wandering around the White House on her own in search of POTUS, Penny finally comes face-to-face with the President. She isn’t surprised to find out that POTUS is a woman. She’s surprised that she isn’t a monster after all – she’s a human who happens to be a lot like her.

    I love how this book emphasizes the fact that we are all humans first regardless of our gender.  I think it’s a great book to use for having discussions about presidential elections with many grade levels.  Also teaches children to always keep an open mind and don’t be so quick to judge others.

    Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library by Julie Gassman

    Have you ever thought about bringing your dragon to the library? Don’t do it! You might have the best intentions, but that dragon will cause nothing but trouble. Using rhyming text and a diverse cast of characters, this charming picture book will provide some important and some not so important library etiquette in a very entertaining way. My kids and I really like this book…it’s a fun and engaging read aloud!

    For the Right to Learn: Malala Yousafzai’s Story by Rebecca Langston-George

    She grew up in a world where women were supposed to be quiet. But Malala Yousafzai refused to be silent. She defied the Taliban’s rules, spoke out for education for every girl, and was almost killed for her beliefs. This powerful true story of how one brave girl named Malala changed the world proves that one person really can make a difference.

    Museum Mysteries: The Case of the Missing Museum Archives by Steve Brezenoff

    When the plans for the prototype of a failed flying machine go missing from the Air and Space Museum’s archives, Amal’s father, the assistant archivist, is blamed. No one suspects a crime has been committed ― except Amal and her friends. With her father’s job on the line, it’s up to them to track down the missing plans. Can Amal and her friends get to the bottom of the museum mystery before it’s too late?

    I recently announced this book to be our read aloud chapter book of the month for February!  Won’t you join us and read this book aloud with your kiddos starting on February 1, 2017?  Read more about our diverse read aloud chapter book club here.

    Katie Woo and Friends by Fran Manushkin

    We just love Katie Woo, don’t you?  Katie Woo loves playing with her friends JoJo and Pedro. They do everything together, from losing teeth to looking for ghosts. Even when they argue, they always make up in the end. After all, there’s nothing like a good friend.

    Dear Molly, Dear Olive: Molly Meets Trouble by Megan Atwood

    There’s a new girl in the third-grade, and for some reason, she brings out the worst in Molly. If only Molly’s cross-country pen pal, Olive, were there. But Olive’s got her OWN set of troubles with her new gymnastics team. As both girls struggle to make new friends, their dishonest emails and letters to each other threaten their relationshp. First-person narratives that alternate point-of-view from chapter to chapter bring the main characters to life.

    Sofia Martinez: My Vida Loca by Jacqueline Jules

    Even the most basic chores can be fun when Sofia is involved! From washing a car to cooking with grandma, this smart and funny 7-year-old knows how to make every moment count. Follow Sofia through three every day adventures in this early chapter book and find out why Sofia has such a crazy life!

    Pedro, First-Grade Hero by Fran Manushkin

    Spend some time with Pedro, Katie Woo’s fun-loving friend. From a buggy disaster to a run for class president, Pedro has what it takes to be the hero of first-grade. No matter what he’s doing, Pedro is always good for some laughs and adventure.

    An Extra-Ordinary Girl (Ellie Ultra) by Gina Bellisario

    Ellie is super excited for first day at Winkopolis Elementary School. After spending her whole life being homeschooled by super-genius inventor parents, she can’t wait to hang out with normal kids and learn normal things. But Ellie soon learns that her super powers make her stand out in a not-so-super way. Can she save the world and fit in with her new friends? Or is blending in the one thing this superhero can’t do?

    Connect with Capstone Young Readers on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and  Instagram.

    About Multicultural Children’s Book Day
    Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017 (1/27/17) is its fourth year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness on the ongoing need to include kid’s books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

    Despite census data that shows 37% of the US population consists of people of color, only 10% of children’s books published have diversity content. Using the Multicultural Children’s Book Day holiday, the MCBD Team are on a mission to change all of that.

    Current Sponsors:  MCBD 2017 is honored to have some amazing Sponsors on board. Platinum Sponsors include ScholasticBarefoot Books and Broccoli. Other Medallion Level Sponsors include heavy-hitters like Author Carole P. RomanAudrey Press, Candlewick Press,  Fathers Incorporated, KidLitTVCapstone Young Readers, ChildsPlayUsa, Author Gayle SwiftWisdom Tales PressLee& Low BooksThe Pack-n-Go GirlsLive Oak MediaAuthor Charlotte Riggle, Chronicle Books and Pomelo Books

    Author Sponsors include: Karen Leggett AbourayaVeronica AppletonSusan Bernardo, Kathleen BurkinshawMaria DismondyD.G. DriverGeoff Griffin Savannah HendricksStephen HodgesCarmen Bernier-Grand,Vahid ImaniGwen Jackson,  Hena, Kahn, David Kelly, Mariana LlanosNatasha Moulton-LevyTeddy O’MalleyStacy McAnulty,  Cerece MurphyMiranda PaulAnnette PimentelGreg RansomSandra RichardsElsa TakaokaGraciela Tiscareño-Sato,  Sarah Stevenson, Monica Mathis-Stowe SmartChoiceNation, Andrea Y. Wang

    You can view the co-hosts here.

    Connect with MCCBD!
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MulticulturalChildrensBookDay
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/MCChildsBookDay
    Official Hashtag:  #ReadYourWorld

    Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: http://bit.ly/1kGZrta

    Free Kindness Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teachers-classroom-kindness-kit/

    Free Diversity Book Lists and Activities for Teachers and Parents: http://bit.ly/1sZ5s8i

    Your turn: Which of these books have you read with your little readers?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    book reviews, children's books

    Daddy, There’s a Noise Outside by Kenneth Braswell (A Book Review)

    I’m honored to take part in the 4th annual Multicultural Children’s Book Day event for another year.  Thank you to Fathers Incorporated for supplying us with complimentary copies of their empowering books to read and share!

    Daddy, There’s a Noise Outside by Kenneth Braswell, illustrated by Joe Dent & Julie Anderson

    Synopsis
    This engaging story begins when two children are awakened by noises in the middle of the night outside the window of their inner-city neighborhood. Both their Dad and Mom spend the next morning explaining to them what was taking place in their community.

    Reflection
    Following the Black Lives Matter movement in 2016, parents, educators and librarians around the world have been looking for ways to talk to children about race, justice and privilege.  Over the past few years, it is sadly evident we still have a great deal of work to do to heal racial issues in our society.  As a parent, I believe it is critical to be prepared to address any questions or concerns children may have about things they see in the media or in their communities.  This can be done by educating ourselves on the issues and ensuring we can use quality resources and books like Daddy, There’s a Noise Outside to teach and understand the current and historic justice debates and protests.

    Daddy, There’s a Noise Outside begins when a brother and sister are awakened by noises in the middle of the night outside the window of their inner-city neighborhood.  When they wake up the next morning their parents explain what was taking place in their community.

    I love how the author takes the complex subject matter of protesting and communicates it in a way that’s easy for children ages 5 – 9 can understand.  For example, there is an example of the father taking away a toy truck for not doing chores. As a result, the son folds his arms, stomps away and starts pouting.  The father points out that’s a form of protesting something the son did not like.  That’s a pretty straightforward and easy example to comprehend, right?

    I also appreciate how naturally curious the kids in this book are about current events and their roles as emerging citizens.  We’re seeing this happen more often now as children have instant access to events with their smartphones. I think the parents do a wonderful job teaching their children about what it means to protest by researching past events from the Civil Rights era and the Million Man March.  The children also learn there are several different types of protests like: boycotts, marches, silent sit-ins, petitions, letter writing and civil disobedience.

    Overall, I believe this book is an excellent conversation starter to talk to your children about protesting and standing up for things they believe in.  Since this book has such a powerful message, I think reading it is good for both adults and children. For children, it acknowledges that burgeoning awareness of what it is to be a citizen, potential pitfalls included. For adults, it reaffirms your values and reminds you to be a positive role model for your children.

    The back matter includes excerpts from a handy parent/teacher guide that can be downloaded directly here.  There are also a few questions for discussion, a word search puzzle and a list of books to read on the subject matter.

    Also, be sure to check out the second book entitled Daddy is Feeling Blue (available now) and Daddy’s Family Tree in June 2017.

    About Fathers Incorporated
    Established in 2004, Fathers Incorporated serves as a leader in the field of Responsible Fatherhood. The agency’s international, national, and local mission focuses on remediating the impact of father absence. Their objective is to help fathers and children connect, raise awareness of the need for positive father involvement, and educate men and women about the importance of healthy father-child relationships.

    About Multicultural Children’s Book Day
    Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017 (1/27/17) is its fourth year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness on the ongoing need to include kid’s books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

    Despite census data that shows 37% of the US population consists of people of color, only 10% of children’s books published have diversity content. Using the Multicultural Children’s Book Day holiday, the MCBD Team are on a mission to change all of that.

    Current Sponsors:  MCBD 2017 is honored to have some amazing Sponsors on board. Platinum Sponsors include ScholasticBarefoot Books and Broccoli. Other Medallion Level Sponsors include heavy-hitters like Author Carole P. RomanAudrey Press, Candlewick Press,  Fathers Incorporated, KidLitTVCapstone Young Readers, ChildsPlayUsa, Author Gayle SwiftWisdom Tales PressLee& Low BooksThe Pack-n-Go GirlsLive Oak MediaAuthor Charlotte Riggle, Chronicle Books and Pomelo Books

    Author Sponsors include: Karen Leggett AbourayaVeronica AppletonSusan Bernardo, Kathleen BurkinshawMaria DismondyD.G. DriverGeoff Griffin Savannah HendricksStephen HodgesCarmen Bernier-Grand,Vahid ImaniGwen Jackson,  Hena, Kahn, David Kelly, Mariana LlanosNatasha Moulton-LevyTeddy O’MalleyStacy McAnulty,  Cerece MurphyMiranda PaulAnnette PimentelGreg RansomSandra RichardsElsa TakaokaGraciela Tiscareño-Sato,  Sarah Stevenson, Monica Mathis-Stowe SmartChoiceNation, Andrea Y. Wang

    You can view the co-hosts here.

    Connect with MCCBD!
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MulticulturalChildrensBookDay
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/MCChildsBookDay
    Official Hashtag:  #ReadYourWorld

    Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: http://bit.ly/1kGZrta

    Free Kindness Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teachers-classroom-kindness-kit/

    Free Diversity Book Lists and Activities for Teachers and Parents: http://bit.ly/1sZ5s8i

    Your turn: How do you talk with your children about difficult topics like protests and justice?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    book reviews, children's books, holiday books

    Love Is by Diane Adams (A Book Review)

    Love Is by Diane Adams, illustrated by Claire Keane

    Publisher: Chronicle Books
    Pages: 32
    Format: Hardcover
    Age Range: 2-5 years old
    Grade Level: Preschool – Kindergarten
    Available for Sale: January 24, 2017

    Synopsis
    Perfect for Valentine’s Day—or any tender moment—this story of a girl and a duckling who share a touching year together will melt hearts old and young. In this tenderly funny book, girl and duckling grow in their understanding of what it is to care for each other, discovering that love is as much about letting go as it is about holding tight. Children and parents together will adore this fond exploration of growing up while learning about the joys of love offered and love returned.

    Reflection
    What exactly is love? How do you define it?  One definition I remember learning at a young age is: love is caring for others without any regard to what you get in return.

    It seems most people have a different definition of the word love. And we are all correct in our own way, right?  I think Love Is does an amazing job teaching the smallest readers the meaning of the word love through playful text and whimsical illustrations.

    You guys, I think this book is beyond adorable.  I am completely smitten with it!  After a little duckling follows a butterfly out of a park, a little brown-skinned girl sporting the cutest pom pom ponytails you ever did see, picks it up and brings it home to nurture it. As time goes on, you see the duckling grow and eventually moves on to go back out into nature with its family. In the end, the duck returns back to the girl with a new duckling family of its own.

    The soothing rhyming text seems to flow so well throughout the book. I just love every single verse. This book truly touched me and even made me laugh and tear up in some parts because I think it’s so beautifully done.

    “Love is missing, reminiscing, wishing things could stay the same.  It’s understanding even ducklings, like the seasons, have to change.”

    “It’s peaceful sleeping, no more peeping, tucked in tightly, head to toes. Love is waking up together, side by side, and beak to nose.”

    I also admire the loose, flowy lines and warm color palette the illustrator used for this book. There are gorgeous tones of: pink, red, yellow, purple and teal.  It’s no surprise this talented illustrator did some artwork for the movies Tangled and Frozen.  I’m looking forward to seeing more work from her in future books.

    I think the overall message of Love Is teaches children how to love, nurture and care for others.  There are also themes of: growing up, coping with change and learning to let go of things.  The popular saying “If you love something, let it go. If it comes back to you, it’s yours forever.” echos throughout.  I love how when the little girl sees the butterfly again later in the book she then sees a brood of ducklings being led by the same duckling she raised who is now all grown up.  It’s a nice way to show things coming full circle.

    After reading the book for the first time on my own, I sat quietly at the kitchen table and jotted down a few new thoughts on what love means to me. Here’s what I came up with:

    Love is an action – It’s the way you talk and show your love to others and to God. It’s how you express your love to your spouse/partner, your children, your friends/family, animals and nature. It’s hugging, kissing and telling others how much you love them. It’s helping others when they are in need. It’s the way you take care of the things that mean the most to you.

    Love is making sacrifices – I believe in order for true love to exist there must be some level of sacrifice involved. In my experience, becoming a wife and mother has taught me what true sacrifice and unconditional love is.

    So again I ask, how do you define love?

    I’d highly recommend reading this book with your little readers – especially around Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day.  A fun extension activity might be to ask kids what love means to them and write out their answers on paper hearts.

    Your turn: How do you define the word love?  Will you be reading this book with your little readers?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    book reviews, children's books, read aloud

    Phoebe Sounds It Out (A Book Review)

    Phoebe Sounds It Out by Julie Zwillich, illustrated by Denise Holmes

    Publisher: Owlkids Books
    Format: Hardcover
    Pages: 32
    Age Range: 3 – 7 years old
    Grade Level: Preschool – 2
    Available for pre-order now!  Publishes April, 2017.

    Synopsis
    Meet Phoebe. Unfortunately, her name doesn’t look quite like it sounds. At school, her classmates practice writing their names, but Phoebe struggles. Her teacher tells her to “just sound it out.” Phoebe doubts herself and procrastinates before resolving to try. Readers are privy to her funny, endearing interior monologue and little-kid rationale as she writes the result: FEEBY.

    Told in a relatable, introspective voice, this school story conveys the feelings and worries of a 5-year-old and supports learning about sounds and letters. Readers will see from Phoebe’s fellow kindergartners’ attempts that everyone makes mistakes, and that we can take pride in effort and not just perfection.

    Reflection
    I am stickler for using good grammar and spelling words correctly so my initial reaction to 5 year-old Phoebe spelling her name as “Feeby” made my toes curl.  I was thinking why didn’t the teacher correct her spelling mistake? Isn’t that what teachers should do?  I guess the answer to this question depends on the teacher’s preference and their approach.  Although I would think many Kindergarten teachers are more interested in children trying their best than spelling every word correctly including their names.

    In reading about this topic before in the past I’ve learned in the early grades many educators encourage inventive spelling, also known as temporary spelling — where the child makes his/her best guess on the spelling of the word, rather than stopping to find out the correct version.  Studies have shown that kids who are allowed to use inventive spelling learn to write more quickly, more fluently, and with a richer vocabulary than those who work under more rigid spelling expectations.  It isn’t until the later grades where spelling becomes more important and is enforced more frequently.

    I love how creative Phoebe is in this book.  She knows her name starts with the letter ‘P’, but she comes up with her own way to spell it that sounds correct to her.  She figures her mother must have made a mistake the way she spelled it because let’s face it, mams make mistakes too.  When the assistant teacher Ms. April tells Phoebe to “sound it out” she proudly writes her name ‘Feeby’.

    I don’t remember how I spelled my name in the early years, but I’m sure I didn’t always get it exactly right just like Phoebe. I appreciate the fact that the teacher didn’t point out Phoebe’s errors and her classmates didn’t make fun of her.  It’s clear spelling is not a priority for this particular name writing assignment or at this particular stage. Instead, the teacher praises Phoebe’s content and says, “What a great start.”

    When you think about it, producing a finished piece of writing is a lot like putting on a polished musical performance. Learning how to write takes a lot of mental work and trying to spell or write every word perfectly can slow the whole process way down.  I’m glad little Phoebe didn’t let this slow her down.  As you can see from some of the illustrations in the book, some of the kids write their letters backwards which is perfectly acceptable at this age.

    Overall, we enjoyed this book.  The pencil illustrations are darling and show a diverse group of children and teachers throughout. Phoebe’s outfit is so cute and seems to match her personality.  A great book for embracing inventive spelling, teaching children how to spell their names, building confidence, and teaching children it’s okay to make mistakes.  Be sure to check this one out when it publishes in April 2017!

    Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions expressed are my own.

    Your turn:

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    Lola Gets a Cat by Anna McQuinn (A Book Review)

    Lola Gets a Cat by Anna McQuinn, illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw

    Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing
    Format: Hardcover
    Pages: 28
    Age Range: 2 – 5
    Grade Level: Preschool – Kindergarten

    Synopsis
    Lola wants a cat, but Mommy says taking care of a pet is a lot of work. So Lola does her homework. At the library she finds books about cats and pet care and she and Mommy learn as much as they can. She pretends her stuffed kitty is real and practices taking care of it. When the time comes, Lola is allowed to pick out her new friend at an animal shelter. With patience and care, her kitten settles in at home.

    Reflection
    We absolutely adore every book in the Lola & Leo series by Anna McQuinn including this soon to be released one entitled Lola Gets a Cat.  So far we’ve seen Lola read stories to her little brother Leo, listen to stories with her dad, plant her own garden and visit the library.  Now Lola is ready to take on the responsibility of pet ownership by adopting a cat from a local animal shelter.

    I love how Lola takes charge and does her own research by going to to the library to find books about cats and pet care.  I also appreciate the fact that they adopted a cat from an animal shelter.  Lola also makes the cat a special corner at home and goes shopping for supplies with her mom.  In the end, Lola is shown being so happy and content all snuggled up with her new furry friend who she names Makeda after an African queen.

    The acrylic illustrations are just darling and so detailed throughout!  Oh, and is Lola’s mom carrying an Orla Kiely handbag? Yes, she must be, right?  My kids love pretending Lola is my daughter, Lola’s parents are me and my husband and Lola’s friend Ty shown in this book is my son.  I love being able to read so many diverse books like this one with them that serve as mirrors so they can see themselves being reflected.


    Although the plot of this story is quite simple, yet oh so sweet, I think it serves a much deeper meaning on many levels. Kids are easily influenced and their early experiences determine what they can be based on the examples around them. Not only does this book teach kids they can also own a pet like Lola, but it also teaches them about responsibility, feelings, adjusting to change, adoption, giving, love and family. But most importantly, it allows little girls and boys to see themselves reflected in a book surrounded by a loving and supportive family.  A great addition to Lola series and a treasure that is sure to be enjoyed again and again.

    Feline lovers are sure to enjoy this one.  I think it’s great for teaching kids about the responsibilities of pet ownership and would make a wonderful Valentine’s gift for any little reader.  Lola Gets a Cat is available for pre-order now.

    Your turn: Do you and your little readers enjoy the Lola & Leo book series by Anna McQuinn?  Which book in the series is your favorite?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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    book reviews, children's books, read aloud

    My Color is Rainbow by Agnes Hsu (A Book Review)

    My Color is Rainbow by Agnes Hsu, illustrated by Yuliya Gwilym

    Publisher: hello, Wonderful
    Format: Hardcover
    Pages: 32

    Synopsis
    Follow Little White Arch on his journey as he wonders what his color could be. Along the way he meets many colorful characters who help him realize the answer. A playful story about kindness, acceptance, and openness that celebrates how we are not defined by one, but many wonderful characteristics.

    Reflection
    Who doesn’t love rainbows? They are colorful, magical, and full of hope! Rainbows are a bridge into other times and cultures, science, color theory, and more!  I know whenever I see a rainbow in the sky it immediately evokes happiness within me.  There’s just something about seeing all seven colors of the rainbow together as one that instantly makes me smile and fills me with joy.  Perhaps you can relate.

    My Color is Rainbow starts off introducing White Arch, the main protagonist.  White Arch looked white, but deep down he felt like he was much more than just the color white.  So he dreamed of the many different possibilities of what color he might actually be: red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple.

    I think one great aspect of this book is that it presents many of the different associations that colors have with emotions– for example red is often associated with love, yellow usually represents happiness and blue can mean feeling peaceful.  These are common expressions in our language, and this book presents those in a straightforward manner that can easily be grasped by the youngest readers.

    My Color is Rainbow is also filled with bright and colorful illustrations.  Each two-page spread uses different colors of the rainbow to represent the color White Arch is dreaming of possibly becoming. My kids love pointing out each of the colors as well as all of the various things taking place on each page.  They love seeing White Arch on the last page riding on the horse sporting his new rainbow colors.

    In the end, White Arch decides his favorite color isn’t any one particular color. His favorite color is rainbow! What wonderful messages of diversity, inclusiveness, kindness and acceptance this book sends to babies, preschoolers and early readers!  Add this colorful book to your little readers home or school library…especially if they love rainbows!  It’s great for teaching kids about colors and feelings and it’s a great self-discovery book.  As an advocate for diversity and inclusiveness, I appreciate that this book sends a clear message that all colors do indeed matter.  Yes, representation matters!

    Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.

    About the Author
    Agnes Hsu can be found these days happily creating on hello, Wonderful, overseeing her daughter’s kindness project Rainbow Rock Project, and running her Plaeful store featuring her first product launch, an erasable wall decal to inspire kids to draw.

    Agnes’ work has been featured in nationwide publications in print and online such as Real Simple, Women’s Day, Better Homes & Gardens, Shutterfly, Tiny Prints, Elizabeth Street, Buzzfeed, Good Housekeeping, Spoonful and Babble.

    About the Illustrator
    Yuliya Gwilym aka yufrukt, is an illustrator, designer and published author focused on creating for children. Born and raised in Ukraine, she has been living in the Netherlands since 2008.  She creates illustrations for books, magazines, clothes, toys, stationery and more. Visit her website here.

    Your turn:  
    Have you read this book with your little readers yet?  Feel free to share in the comments.

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